Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Evidence for rapid auditory perception as the foundation of speech processing: a sparse temporal sampling fMRI study - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Zaehle, Tino; Wüstenberg, T; Meyer, Martin; Jäncke, Lutz (2004). Evidence for rapid auditory perception as the foundation of speech processing: a sparse temporal sampling fMRI study. European Journal of Neuroscience, 20(9):2447-2456.

Abstract

We examined the processing of verbal and nonverbal auditory stimuli using an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to reveal the neural underpinnings of rapid temporal information processing and it's relevance during speech perception. In the context of a clustered sparse-temporal fMRI data collection eight right-handed native German speakers performed: (i) an auditory gap detection task; and (ii) a CV syllable discrimination task. A tone perception task served as a nontemporal control condition. Here we aimed to research to what extent the left hemisphere preferentially processes linguistically relevant temporal information available in speech and nonspeech stimuli. Furthermore, we sought to find out as to whether a left hemisphere's preference for linguistically relevant temporal information is specifically constrained to verbal utterances or if nonlinguistic temporal information may also activate these areas. We collected haemodynamic responses from three time points of acquisition (TPA) with varying temporal distance from stimulus onset to gain an insight on the time course of auditory processing. Results show exclusively left-sided activations of primary and secondary auditory cortex associated with the perception of rapid temporal information. Furthermore, the data shows an overlap of activations evoked by nonspeech sounds and speech stimuli within primary and secondary auditory cortex of the left hemisphere. The present data clearly support the assumption of a shared neural network for rapid temporal information processing within the auditory domain for both speech and nonspeech signals situated in left superior temporal areas.

Abstract

We examined the processing of verbal and nonverbal auditory stimuli using an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) study to reveal the neural underpinnings of rapid temporal information processing and it's relevance during speech perception. In the context of a clustered sparse-temporal fMRI data collection eight right-handed native German speakers performed: (i) an auditory gap detection task; and (ii) a CV syllable discrimination task. A tone perception task served as a nontemporal control condition. Here we aimed to research to what extent the left hemisphere preferentially processes linguistically relevant temporal information available in speech and nonspeech stimuli. Furthermore, we sought to find out as to whether a left hemisphere's preference for linguistically relevant temporal information is specifically constrained to verbal utterances or if nonlinguistic temporal information may also activate these areas. We collected haemodynamic responses from three time points of acquisition (TPA) with varying temporal distance from stimulus onset to gain an insight on the time course of auditory processing. Results show exclusively left-sided activations of primary and secondary auditory cortex associated with the perception of rapid temporal information. Furthermore, the data shows an overlap of activations evoked by nonspeech sounds and speech stimuli within primary and secondary auditory cortex of the left hemisphere. The present data clearly support the assumption of a shared neural network for rapid temporal information processing within the auditory domain for both speech and nonspeech signals situated in left superior temporal areas.

Citations

90 citations in Web of Science®
98 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2004
Deposited On:30 Apr 2013 08:56
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:46
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0953-816X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1460-9568.2004.03687.x
PubMed ID:15525285

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations