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Ridicule and being laughed at in the family: Gelotophobia, gelotophilia, and katagelasticism in young children and their parents


Proyer, Rene T; Neukom, Monica (2013). Ridicule and being laughed at in the family: Gelotophobia, gelotophilia, and katagelasticism in young children and their parents. International Journal of Psychology, 48(6):1191-1195.

Abstract

T he fear of being laughed at (gelotophobia), the joy of being laughed at (gelotophilia), and the joy of laughing at others (katagelasticism) were tested in a sample of 189 7- and 8-year-olds and their parents (185 mothers, 160 fathers). The dispositions were widely unrelated in the full sample. There was a positive relation between girls’ and mothers’ katagelasticism as well as between the 7-year-old boys’ katagelasticism and their parents’ gelotophilia. Furthermore, the 8-year-old boys’ fear of being laughed at correlated robustly positively with their parents’ gelotophobia and their gelotophilia with their parents’ katagelasticism. Similarities/dissimilarities in the parental expression in the dispositions had no impact on the scores in the children. The findings are different from relations reported for parents and their adult children. The study provides ground for further studies on how families deal with ridicule and being
laughed at.

Abstract

T he fear of being laughed at (gelotophobia), the joy of being laughed at (gelotophilia), and the joy of laughing at others (katagelasticism) were tested in a sample of 189 7- and 8-year-olds and their parents (185 mothers, 160 fathers). The dispositions were widely unrelated in the full sample. There was a positive relation between girls’ and mothers’ katagelasticism as well as between the 7-year-old boys’ katagelasticism and their parents’ gelotophilia. Furthermore, the 8-year-old boys’ fear of being laughed at correlated robustly positively with their parents’ gelotophobia and their gelotophilia with their parents’ katagelasticism. Similarities/dissimilarities in the parental expression in the dispositions had no impact on the scores in the children. The findings are different from relations reported for parents and their adult children. The study provides ground for further studies on how families deal with ridicule and being
laughed at.

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3 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2013
Deposited On:08 May 2013 10:58
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:47
Publisher:Taylor & Francis
ISSN:0020-7594
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1080/00207594.2013.775448

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