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Konfuzianische Convenevolezza in chinesischen christlichen Illustrationen. Das Tianzhu jiangsheng chuxiang jingjie von 1637


Qu, Yi (2012). Konfuzianische Convenevolezza in chinesischen christlichen Illustrationen. Das Tianzhu jiangsheng chuxiang jingjie von 1637. Asiatische Studien / Études Asiatiques, 66(4):1001-1029.

Abstract

Since the fourteenth century, the terminology of convenevolezza, i.e. the application of contemporary costume and theater designs in the artistic representation of historical narratives, was much discussed in Italian art circles. Jesuit missionaries were also familiar with this concept. In the seventeenth century, soon after the beginning of their missionary activities in China, the Jesuits chose this artistic method for conveying the Christian ideas to the Chinese more effectively. This can be seen in their biblical illustrations for the Chinese public, which combine holy stories with Chinese contemporary costumes, furniture, decorations etc. Inspired by Evangelicae historiae imagines, a book originating in Europe, Jesuits published in 1637 the first illustrated “Life of Christ” in Chinese, Tianzhu jiang sheng chuxiang jingjie 天主降生出像經解 (Explanation of the Canonical Book about the Lord of Heaven’s Incarnation with Selected Images). Many objects represented in the woodblock prints in this book refer to Confucian lifestyle, symbols or philosophies. Focused on this book and comparing its engravings with those in the Western original, this paper examines the application of convenevolezza to Chinese woodblock prints. The present study argues that the Jesuits’ policy of accommodating Christianity to Confucianism was substantially implemented by this artistic practice.

Abstract

Since the fourteenth century, the terminology of convenevolezza, i.e. the application of contemporary costume and theater designs in the artistic representation of historical narratives, was much discussed in Italian art circles. Jesuit missionaries were also familiar with this concept. In the seventeenth century, soon after the beginning of their missionary activities in China, the Jesuits chose this artistic method for conveying the Christian ideas to the Chinese more effectively. This can be seen in their biblical illustrations for the Chinese public, which combine holy stories with Chinese contemporary costumes, furniture, decorations etc. Inspired by Evangelicae historiae imagines, a book originating in Europe, Jesuits published in 1637 the first illustrated “Life of Christ” in Chinese, Tianzhu jiang sheng chuxiang jingjie 天主降生出像經解 (Explanation of the Canonical Book about the Lord of Heaven’s Incarnation with Selected Images). Many objects represented in the woodblock prints in this book refer to Confucian lifestyle, symbols or philosophies. Focused on this book and comparing its engravings with those in the Western original, this paper examines the application of convenevolezza to Chinese woodblock prints. The present study argues that the Jesuits’ policy of accommodating Christianity to Confucianism was substantially implemented by this artistic practice.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:Journals > Asiatische Studien / Études Asiatiques > Archive > 66 (2012) > 4
Dewey Decimal Classification:950 History of Asia
Language:German
Date:2012
Deposited On:05 Jun 2013 09:28
Last Modified:26 Jan 2017 08:54
Publisher:Schweizerische Asiengesellschaft / Verlag Peter Lang
ISSN:0004-4717
Related URLs:http://www.sagw.ch/de/asiengesellschaft/publikationen/Asiatische-Studien.html (Publisher)
http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?vID=86850&vLang=D&vHR=1&vUR=4&vUUR=11 (Publisher)

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