Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Characterization of stapes anatomy: Investigation of human and guinea pig


Sim, J H; Röösli, C; Chatzimichalis, M; Eiber, A; Huber, A M (2013). Characterization of stapes anatomy: Investigation of human and guinea pig. Journal of the Association for Research in Otolaryngology (JARO), 14(2):159-73.

Abstract

The accuracy of any stapes model relies on the accuracy of the anatomical information upon which it is based. In many previous models and measurements of the stapes, the shape of the stapes has been considered as symmetric with respect to the long and short axes of the footplate. Therefore, the reference frame has been built based upon this assumption. This study aimed to provide detailed anatomical information on the dimensions of the stapes, including its asymmetries. High-resolution microcomputed tomography data from 53 human stapes and 11 guinea pig stapes were collected, and their anatomical features were analyzed. Global dimensions of the stapes, such as the size of the footplate, height, and volume, were compared between human and guinea pig specimens, and asymmetric features of the stapes were quantitatively examined. Further, dependence of the stapes dimensions on demographic characteristics of the subjects was explored. The height of the stapes relative to the footplate size in the human stapes was found to be larger than the corresponding value in guinea pig. The stapes showed asymmetry of the footplate with respect to the long axis and offset of the stapes head from the centroid of the medial surface of the footplate for both humans and guinea pigs. The medial surface of the footplate was curved, and the longitudinal arches of the medial surface along the long axis of the footplate were shaped differently between humans and guinea pigs. The dimension of the footplate was gender-dependent, with the size greater in men than in women.

Abstract

The accuracy of any stapes model relies on the accuracy of the anatomical information upon which it is based. In many previous models and measurements of the stapes, the shape of the stapes has been considered as symmetric with respect to the long and short axes of the footplate. Therefore, the reference frame has been built based upon this assumption. This study aimed to provide detailed anatomical information on the dimensions of the stapes, including its asymmetries. High-resolution microcomputed tomography data from 53 human stapes and 11 guinea pig stapes were collected, and their anatomical features were analyzed. Global dimensions of the stapes, such as the size of the footplate, height, and volume, were compared between human and guinea pig specimens, and asymmetric features of the stapes were quantitatively examined. Further, dependence of the stapes dimensions on demographic characteristics of the subjects was explored. The height of the stapes relative to the footplate size in the human stapes was found to be larger than the corresponding value in guinea pig. The stapes showed asymmetry of the footplate with respect to the long axis and offset of the stapes head from the centroid of the medial surface of the footplate for both humans and guinea pigs. The medial surface of the footplate was curved, and the longitudinal arches of the medial surface along the long axis of the footplate were shaped differently between humans and guinea pigs. The dimension of the footplate was gender-dependent, with the size greater in men than in women.

Statistics

Citations

10 citations in Web of Science®
4 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Otorhinolaryngology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:02 Jul 2013 14:49
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 21:33
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:1438-7573
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s10162-012-0369-5
PubMed ID:23299488

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher