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Group II Intron Ribozymes and Metal Ions - A Delicate Relationship


Sigel, Roland K O (2005). Group II Intron Ribozymes and Metal Ions - A Delicate Relationship. European Journal of Inorganic Chemistry, 2005(12):2281-2292.

Abstract

Group II introns are naturally occurring ribozymes in plants, fungi, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes that undergo a fascinating array of reactions. These large molecular machines with a size ranging between 600 and 2500 nucleotides are self-splicing introns also capable of reinserting themselves into RNA or DNA, thus making them mobile genetic elements. The structural information available on group II intron ribozymes is very scarce. So far only one crystal structure and one NMR solution structure of two domains located in the catalytic core are available. For proper folding and function, each intron requires specific concentrations of monovalent and divalent metal ions. Although most of these metal ions are used for charge screening, some are bound to distinct sites as has been shown by hydrolytic cleavage experiments. These specifically bound ions are crucial for tertiary contact formation and catalysis. This review will discuss the different metal ion requirements of self-splicing group II introns, the available structural data and information on the binding location and affinity of metal ions, as well as the methods applied to investigate the metal ion binding properties of these large RNAs. Due to the size of these introns, the richness of local structures, the catalytic versatility and the involvement of metal ions in all of the above mentioned aspects, group II introns are an ideal target to be studied by combined means from the fields of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Analytical, and (Bio)Inorganic Chemistry.

Abstract

Group II introns are naturally occurring ribozymes in plants, fungi, bacteria, and lower eukaryotes that undergo a fascinating array of reactions. These large molecular machines with a size ranging between 600 and 2500 nucleotides are self-splicing introns also capable of reinserting themselves into RNA or DNA, thus making them mobile genetic elements. The structural information available on group II intron ribozymes is very scarce. So far only one crystal structure and one NMR solution structure of two domains located in the catalytic core are available. For proper folding and function, each intron requires specific concentrations of monovalent and divalent metal ions. Although most of these metal ions are used for charge screening, some are bound to distinct sites as has been shown by hydrolytic cleavage experiments. These specifically bound ions are crucial for tertiary contact formation and catalysis. This review will discuss the different metal ion requirements of self-splicing group II introns, the available structural data and information on the binding location and affinity of metal ions, as well as the methods applied to investigate the metal ion binding properties of these large RNAs. Due to the size of these introns, the richness of local structures, the catalytic versatility and the involvement of metal ions in all of the above mentioned aspects, group II introns are an ideal target to be studied by combined means from the fields of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Analytical, and (Bio)Inorganic Chemistry.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Department of Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:June 2005
Deposited On:08 Aug 2013 08:06
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 21:50
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1434-1948
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1002/ejic.200401007

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