Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

From lamins to lamina: a structural perspective


Zwerger, Monika; Medalia, Ohad (2013). From lamins to lamina: a structural perspective. Histochemistry and Cell Biology, 140(1):3-12.

Abstract

Lamin proteins are the major constituents of the nuclear lamina, a proteinaceous network that lines the inner nuclear membrane. Primarily, the nuclear lamina provides structural support for the nucleus and the nuclear envelope; however, lamins and their associated proteins are also involved in most of the nuclear processes, including DNA replication and repair, regulation of gene expression, and signaling. Mutations in human lamin A and associated proteins were found to cause a large number of diseases, termed 'laminopathies.' These diseases include muscular dystrophies, lipodystrophies, neuropathies, and premature aging syndromes. Despite the growing number of studies on lamins and their associated proteins, the molecular organization of lamins in health and disease is still elusive. Likewise, there is no comprehensive view how mutations in lamins result in a plethora of diseases, selectively affecting different tissues. Here, we discuss some of the structural aspects of lamins and the nuclear lamina organization, in light of recent results.

Abstract

Lamin proteins are the major constituents of the nuclear lamina, a proteinaceous network that lines the inner nuclear membrane. Primarily, the nuclear lamina provides structural support for the nucleus and the nuclear envelope; however, lamins and their associated proteins are also involved in most of the nuclear processes, including DNA replication and repair, regulation of gene expression, and signaling. Mutations in human lamin A and associated proteins were found to cause a large number of diseases, termed 'laminopathies.' These diseases include muscular dystrophies, lipodystrophies, neuropathies, and premature aging syndromes. Despite the growing number of studies on lamins and their associated proteins, the molecular organization of lamins in health and disease is still elusive. Likewise, there is no comprehensive view how mutations in lamins result in a plethora of diseases, selectively affecting different tissues. Here, we discuss some of the structural aspects of lamins and the nuclear lamina organization, in light of recent results.

Statistics

Citations

11 citations in Web of Science®
11 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 12 Aug 2013
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Department of Biochemistry
07 Faculty of Science > Department of Biochemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:12 Aug 2013 13:12
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 21:54
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0948-6143
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00418-013-1104-y
PubMed ID:23744527

Download