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Factors influencing the onset and progression of pododermatitis in captive flamingos (Phoenicopteridae)


Wyss, F; Wenker, C; Hoby, S; Gardelli, B; Studer-Thiersch, A; von Houwald, F; Schumacher, V; Clauss, Marcus; Doherr, M G; Häfeli, W; Furrer, S; Béchet, A; Robert, N (2013). Factors influencing the onset and progression of pododermatitis in captive flamingos (Phoenicopteridae). Schweizer Archiv für Tierheilkunde, 155(9):497-503.

Abstract

Pododermatitis is a worldwide problem in captive flaamingos. We performed an evaluation of different influence factors (age, sex, weight, origin, breeding status) and a comparison of foot lesions between several zoological institutions and the feet of free-ranging Greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus). A scoring system was used to determine the prevalence and types of lesions and severity. Cracks and nodules developed as early as 3 months of age and papillomatous growths as early as 6 to 7 months of age in captivity. Nodules with ulceration occurred significantly more often in birds older than 31 years and heavier than 4 kg. The comparison of different institutions revealed that birds kept in enclosures with natural-floored water ponds had significantly less severe lesions than birds kept in concrete water ponds. None of the freeranging flamingos, which live on a muddy underground, showed any lesion. This study demonstrates that flooring, weight and age are important in the onset
and progression of pododermatitis in flamingos.

Abstract

Pododermatitis is a worldwide problem in captive flaamingos. We performed an evaluation of different influence factors (age, sex, weight, origin, breeding status) and a comparison of foot lesions between several zoological institutions and the feet of free-ranging Greater flamingos (Phoenicopterus roseus). A scoring system was used to determine the prevalence and types of lesions and severity. Cracks and nodules developed as early as 3 months of age and papillomatous growths as early as 6 to 7 months of age in captivity. Nodules with ulceration occurred significantly more often in birds older than 31 years and heavier than 4 kg. The comparison of different institutions revealed that birds kept in enclosures with natural-floored water ponds had significantly less severe lesions than birds kept in concrete water ponds. None of the freeranging flamingos, which live on a muddy underground, showed any lesion. This study demonstrates that flooring, weight and age are important in the onset
and progression of pododermatitis in flamingos.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Small Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:23 Aug 2013 05:47
Last Modified:26 Jan 2017 08:54
Publisher:Hans Huber
ISSN:0036-7281
Additional Information:Diese Artikelfassung entspricht nicht vollständig dem in der Zeitschrift veröffentlichten Artikel. Dies ist nicht die Originalversion des Artikels und kann daher nicht zur Zitierung herangezogen werden.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1024/0036-7281/a000499

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