Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Individual and dyadic development of personal growth in couples coping with cancer


Künzler, Alfred; Nussbeck, Fridtjof W; Moser, Michael T; Bodenmann, Guy; Kayser, Karen (2014). Individual and dyadic development of personal growth in couples coping with cancer. Supportive Care in Cancer, 22(1):53-62.

Abstract

RATIONALE: Couples share distress as well as potential personal growth (PG) after a cancer diagnosis. It is essential for professionals to learn more about the ways couples cope together with adversity. Dyadic results may help to understand controversial results in the PG literature and inform clinicians in optimizing psychological support for couples.

OBJECTIVE: We examine the temporal and dyadic development of PG among patients and their intimate partners. In addition, life threat is examined as a potential factor influencing PG after cancer diagnosis.

METHODS: We assessed PG using the Personal Growth Inventory in a clinically representative, mixed-type and mixed-stage cancer cohort (N = 154 couples) 6 and 12 months after cancer diagnosis. Medical data on cancer diagnoses and treatments were collected from physicians. Actor-partner interdependence models were applied.

RESULTS: PG was reported by patients and their partners. Women (either as patients or partners) reported more PG than male patients or partners. PG remained relatively stable over 6 months and was related to whether the patient was receiving curative or palliative treatment. Female patients experienced less PG 6 months after the cancer diagnosis and if treatment was curative. Male patients experienced less PG if their partners experienced PG, and the treatment was curative.

CONCLUSIONS: Dyadic growth is a phenomenon not limited to breast cancer or female patient couples and may represent a form of dyadic coping. Patients and partners seem to develop individual and dyadic growth, depending on a combination of gender and life threat. Psycho-oncology services may want to promote both couple level coping and support in order to optimize cancer care.

Abstract

RATIONALE: Couples share distress as well as potential personal growth (PG) after a cancer diagnosis. It is essential for professionals to learn more about the ways couples cope together with adversity. Dyadic results may help to understand controversial results in the PG literature and inform clinicians in optimizing psychological support for couples.

OBJECTIVE: We examine the temporal and dyadic development of PG among patients and their intimate partners. In addition, life threat is examined as a potential factor influencing PG after cancer diagnosis.

METHODS: We assessed PG using the Personal Growth Inventory in a clinically representative, mixed-type and mixed-stage cancer cohort (N = 154 couples) 6 and 12 months after cancer diagnosis. Medical data on cancer diagnoses and treatments were collected from physicians. Actor-partner interdependence models were applied.

RESULTS: PG was reported by patients and their partners. Women (either as patients or partners) reported more PG than male patients or partners. PG remained relatively stable over 6 months and was related to whether the patient was receiving curative or palliative treatment. Female patients experienced less PG 6 months after the cancer diagnosis and if treatment was curative. Male patients experienced less PG if their partners experienced PG, and the treatment was curative.

CONCLUSIONS: Dyadic growth is a phenomenon not limited to breast cancer or female patient couples and may represent a form of dyadic coping. Patients and partners seem to develop individual and dyadic growth, depending on a combination of gender and life threat. Psycho-oncology services may want to promote both couple level coping and support in order to optimize cancer care.

Statistics

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Date:2014
Deposited On:02 Sep 2013 12:51
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 22:16
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0941-4355
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-013-1949-6
PubMed ID:23989500

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher