Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Mitochondrially targeted ceramide LCL-30 inhibits colorectal cancer in mice


Dahm, F; Bielawska, A; Nocito, A; Georgiev, P; Szulc, Z M; Bielawski, J; Jochum, W; Dindo, D; Hannun, Y A; Clavien, P A (2008). Mitochondrially targeted ceramide LCL-30 inhibits colorectal cancer in mice. British Journal of Cancer, 98(1):98-105.

Abstract

The sphingolipid ceramide is intimately involved in the growth, differentiation, senescence, and death of normal and cancerous cells. Mitochondria are increasingly appreciated to play a key role in ceramide-induced cell death. Recent work showed the C16-pyridinium ceramide analogue LCL-30 to induce cell death in vitro by mitochondrial targeting. The aim of the current study was to translate these results to an in vivo model. We found that LCL-30 accumulated in mitochondria in the murine colorectal cancer cell line CT-26 and reduced cellular ATP content, leading to dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity. Although the mitochondrial levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) became elevated, transcription levels of ceramide-metabolising enzymes were not affected. In mice, LCL-30 was rapidly absorbed from the peritoneal cavity and cleared from the circulation within 24 h, but local peritoneal toxicity was dose-limiting. In a model of subcutaneous tumour inoculation, LCL-30 significantly reduced the proliferative activity and the growth rate of established tumours. Sphingolipid profiles in tumour tissue also showed increased levels of S1P. In summary, we present the first in vivo application of a long-chain pyridinium ceramide for the treatment of experimental metastatic colorectal cancer, together with its pharmacokinetic parameters. LCL-30 was an efficacious and safe agent. Future studies should identify an improved application route and effective partners for combination treatment.

Abstract

The sphingolipid ceramide is intimately involved in the growth, differentiation, senescence, and death of normal and cancerous cells. Mitochondria are increasingly appreciated to play a key role in ceramide-induced cell death. Recent work showed the C16-pyridinium ceramide analogue LCL-30 to induce cell death in vitro by mitochondrial targeting. The aim of the current study was to translate these results to an in vivo model. We found that LCL-30 accumulated in mitochondria in the murine colorectal cancer cell line CT-26 and reduced cellular ATP content, leading to dose- and time-dependent cytotoxicity. Although the mitochondrial levels of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) became elevated, transcription levels of ceramide-metabolising enzymes were not affected. In mice, LCL-30 was rapidly absorbed from the peritoneal cavity and cleared from the circulation within 24 h, but local peritoneal toxicity was dose-limiting. In a model of subcutaneous tumour inoculation, LCL-30 significantly reduced the proliferative activity and the growth rate of established tumours. Sphingolipid profiles in tumour tissue also showed increased levels of S1P. In summary, we present the first in vivo application of a long-chain pyridinium ceramide for the treatment of experimental metastatic colorectal cancer, together with its pharmacokinetic parameters. LCL-30 was an efficacious and safe agent. Future studies should identify an improved application route and effective partners for combination treatment.

Statistics

Citations

21 citations in Web of Science®
24 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 12 Dec 2008
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:12 Dec 2008 07:13
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:42
Publisher:Nature Publishing Group
ISSN:0007-0920
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1038/sj.bjc.6604099
PubMed ID:18026195

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 1MB
View at publisher