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Microarray gene expression profiling reveals antioxidant-like effects of angiotensin II inhibition in atherosclerosis


Abd Alla, Joshua; El Faramawy, Yasser; Quitterer, Ursula (2013). Microarray gene expression profiling reveals antioxidant-like effects of angiotensin II inhibition in atherosclerosis. Frontiers in Physiology:4:148.

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a significant feature of atherosclerosis but the impact of ROS on atherogenesis is not clear since antioxidants such as vitamin E have little effect on atherosclerosis development in vivo. To investigate the role of ROS in atherosclerosis, we used ApoE-deficient mice, and compared the treatment effect of the antioxidant vitamin E with that of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, captopril, because angiotensin II is a major source of ROS in the vasculature. Dihydroethidium (DHE) staining demonstrated that vitamin E and captopril both prevented the atherosclerosis-induced increase in aortic superoxide content. In contrast, seven months of vitamin E treatment retarded the development of atherosclerotic lesions by only 45.8 ± 11.5% whereas captopril reduced the aortic plaque area by 88.1 ± 7.5%. To discriminate between vitamin E-sensitive and -insensitive effects of ACE inhibition, we performed whole genome microarray gene expression profiling. Gene ontology (GO) and immunohistology analyses showed that vitamin E and captopril prevented atherosclerosis-related changes of aortic intima and media genes. However, vitamin E did not reduce the expression of probe sets detecting the aortic recruitment of pro-inflammatory immune cells while immune cell-specific genes were normalized by captopril treatment. Moreover, vitamin E did not prevent the atherosclerosis-dependent down-regulation of perivascular nerve-specific genes, which were preserved in captopril-treated aortas. Taken together, our study detected antioxidant vitamin E-like effects of angiotensin II inhibition in atherosclerosis treatment regarding preservation of aortic intima and media genes. Additional vitamin E-insensitive effects targeting atherosclerosis-enhancing aortic immune cell recruitment and perivascular nerve degeneration could account for the stronger anti-atherogenic activity of ACE inhibition compared to vitamin E.

Abstract

Reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a significant feature of atherosclerosis but the impact of ROS on atherogenesis is not clear since antioxidants such as vitamin E have little effect on atherosclerosis development in vivo. To investigate the role of ROS in atherosclerosis, we used ApoE-deficient mice, and compared the treatment effect of the antioxidant vitamin E with that of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor, captopril, because angiotensin II is a major source of ROS in the vasculature. Dihydroethidium (DHE) staining demonstrated that vitamin E and captopril both prevented the atherosclerosis-induced increase in aortic superoxide content. In contrast, seven months of vitamin E treatment retarded the development of atherosclerotic lesions by only 45.8 ± 11.5% whereas captopril reduced the aortic plaque area by 88.1 ± 7.5%. To discriminate between vitamin E-sensitive and -insensitive effects of ACE inhibition, we performed whole genome microarray gene expression profiling. Gene ontology (GO) and immunohistology analyses showed that vitamin E and captopril prevented atherosclerosis-related changes of aortic intima and media genes. However, vitamin E did not reduce the expression of probe sets detecting the aortic recruitment of pro-inflammatory immune cells while immune cell-specific genes were normalized by captopril treatment. Moreover, vitamin E did not prevent the atherosclerosis-dependent down-regulation of perivascular nerve-specific genes, which were preserved in captopril-treated aortas. Taken together, our study detected antioxidant vitamin E-like effects of angiotensin II inhibition in atherosclerosis treatment regarding preservation of aortic intima and media genes. Additional vitamin E-insensitive effects targeting atherosclerosis-enhancing aortic immune cell recruitment and perivascular nerve degeneration could account for the stronger anti-atherogenic activity of ACE inhibition compared to vitamin E.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:16 Sep 2013 07:26
Last Modified:08 Aug 2017 14:29
Publisher:Frontiers Research Foundation
ISSN:1664-042X
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.3389/fphys.2013.00148
PubMed ID:23801967

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