Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

The development of grasping comprehension in infancy: covert shifts of attention caused by referential actions


Daum, Moritz M; Gredebäck, Gustaf (2011). The development of grasping comprehension in infancy: covert shifts of attention caused by referential actions. Experimental Brain Research, 208(2):297-307.

Abstract

An eye tracking paradigm was used to investigate how infants' attention is modulated by observed goal-directed manual grasping actions. In Experiment 1, we presented 3-, 5-, and 7-month-old infants with a static picture of a grasping hand, followed by a target appearing at a location either congruent or incongruent with the grasping direction of the hand. The latency of infants gaze shift from the hand to the target was recorded and compared between congruent and incongruent trials. Results demonstrate a congruency effect from 5 months of age. A second experiment illustrated that the congruency effect of Experiment 1 does not extend to a visually similar mechanical claw (instead of the grasping hand). Together these two experiments describe the onset of covert attention shifts in response to manual actions and relate these findings to the onset of manual grasping.

Abstract

An eye tracking paradigm was used to investigate how infants' attention is modulated by observed goal-directed manual grasping actions. In Experiment 1, we presented 3-, 5-, and 7-month-old infants with a static picture of a grasping hand, followed by a target appearing at a location either congruent or incongruent with the grasping direction of the hand. The latency of infants gaze shift from the hand to the target was recorded and compared between congruent and incongruent trials. Results demonstrate a congruency effect from 5 months of age. A second experiment illustrated that the congruency effect of Experiment 1 does not extend to a visually similar mechanical claw (instead of the grasping hand). Together these two experiments describe the onset of covert attention shifts in response to manual actions and relate these findings to the onset of manual grasping.

Statistics

Citations

28 citations in Web of Science®
27 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:19 Sep 2013 07:05
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 22:29
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0014-4819
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-010-2479-9
PubMed ID:21082313

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher