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Perception and production of object-related grasping in 6-month-olds


Daum, Moritz M; Prinz, Wolfgang; Aschersleben, Gisa (2011). Perception and production of object-related grasping in 6-month-olds. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 108(4):810-818.

Abstract

In this study, 6-month-olds' perception of an object-related human grasping action was compared with their level of grasping performance using a within-participants design. In the action perception task, infants were presented with the video of an actor's grasping movement toward an occluded target object. Subsequently, an expected and an unexpected final state of this grasping movement were presented simultaneously, and infants' looking times were measured. In the action production task, infants were presented with three graspable objects. Infants' grasping behavior was coded to be either palmar or thumb-opposite grasping. Results indicate that infants who were already able to perform a thumb-opposite grasp differentiated between the two final states in the action perception task by looking longer toward the unexpected final state. In contrast, infants who showed only palmar grasps looked equally long toward both final states. This finding supports the assumption that action perception and action control are already closely related in infants as young as 6 months.

Abstract

In this study, 6-month-olds' perception of an object-related human grasping action was compared with their level of grasping performance using a within-participants design. In the action perception task, infants were presented with the video of an actor's grasping movement toward an occluded target object. Subsequently, an expected and an unexpected final state of this grasping movement were presented simultaneously, and infants' looking times were measured. In the action production task, infants were presented with three graspable objects. Infants' grasping behavior was coded to be either palmar or thumb-opposite grasping. Results indicate that infants who were already able to perform a thumb-opposite grasp differentiated between the two final states in the action perception task by looking longer toward the unexpected final state. In contrast, infants who showed only palmar grasps looked equally long toward both final states. This finding supports the assumption that action perception and action control are already closely related in infants as young as 6 months.

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34 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2011
Deposited On:19 Sep 2013 07:06
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 22:29
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0022-0965
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jecp.2010.10.003
PubMed ID:21092981

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