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Noninvasive imaging of receptor function: signal transduction pathways and physiological readouts


Rudin, M (2008). Noninvasive imaging of receptor function: signal transduction pathways and physiological readouts. Current Opinion in Drug Discovery and Development, 11(5):606-615.

Abstract

Intracellular signaling describes the process of information propagation from the cell surface to the location within the cell where a biological response is executed. Signaling pathways involve a complex network of interacting molecular species. It is obvious that information on the activation of individual pathways is highly relevant in biomedical research, both from a diagnostic point of view and for evaluating therapeutic interventions. Modern molecular imaging approaches are capable of providing such information in a temporo-spatially resolved manner. Two strategies can be pursued: imaging individual pathway molecules or targeting protein-protein interactions, which are key elements of the signaling networks. Assays such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer, two-hybrid, protein fragment complementation or protein splicing have been adapted to allow studies in live mice. The major issues in imaging signal transduction are sensitivity, as critical species occur at low concentration, and the fact that the processes targeted are intracellular, that is, exogenous probes have to cross the cell membrane. Currently, the majority of these imaging methods are based on genetic engineering approaches and are therefore confined to experimental studies in animals. Exogenous probes for targeting intracellular pathway molecules are being developed and may allow translation into the clinic.

Abstract

Intracellular signaling describes the process of information propagation from the cell surface to the location within the cell where a biological response is executed. Signaling pathways involve a complex network of interacting molecular species. It is obvious that information on the activation of individual pathways is highly relevant in biomedical research, both from a diagnostic point of view and for evaluating therapeutic interventions. Modern molecular imaging approaches are capable of providing such information in a temporo-spatially resolved manner. Two strategies can be pursued: imaging individual pathway molecules or targeting protein-protein interactions, which are key elements of the signaling networks. Assays such as fluorescence resonance energy transfer, two-hybrid, protein fragment complementation or protein splicing have been adapted to allow studies in live mice. The major issues in imaging signal transduction are sensitivity, as critical species occur at low concentration, and the fact that the processes targeted are intracellular, that is, exogenous probes have to cross the cell membrane. Currently, the majority of these imaging methods are based on genetic engineering approaches and are therefore confined to experimental studies in animals. Exogenous probes for targeting intracellular pathway molecules are being developed and may allow translation into the clinic.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology

04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2008
Deposited On:16 Dec 2008 11:44
Last Modified:10 Aug 2017 12:21
Publisher:BioMed Central
ISSN:1367-6733
PubMed ID:18729012

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