Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Pupylation as a signal for proteasomal degradation in bacteria


Striebel, Frank; Imkamp, Frank; Ozcelik, Dennis; Weber-Ban, Eilika (2014). Pupylation as a signal for proteasomal degradation in bacteria. Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta, 1843(1):103-113.

Abstract

Posttranslational modifications in the form of covalently attached proteins like ubiquitin (Ub), were long considered an exclusive feature of eukaryotic organisms. The discovery of pupylation, the modification of lysine residues with a prokaryotic, ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), demonstrated that certain bacteria use a tagging pathway functionally related to ubiquitination in order to target proteins for proteasomal degradation. However, functional analogies do not translate into structural or mechanistic relatedness. Bacterial Pup, unlike eukaryotic Ub, does not adopt a β-grasp fold, but is intrinsically disordered. Furthermore, isopeptide bond formation in the pupylation process is carried out by enzymes evolutionary descendent from glutamine synthetases. While in eukaryotes, the proteasome is the main energy-dependent protein degradation machine, bacterial proteasomes exist in addition to other architecturally related degradation complexes, and their specific role along with the role of pupylation is still poorly understood. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the Pup-proteasome system contributes to pathogenicity by supporting the bacterium's persistence within host macrophages. Here, we describe the mechanism and structural framework of pupylation and the targeting of pupylated proteins to the proteasome complex. Particular attention is given to the comparison of the bacterial Pup-proteasome system and the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome system. Furthermore, the involvement of pupylation and proteasomal degradation in Mtb pathogenesis is discussed together with efforts to establish the Pup-proteasome system as a drug target. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System.

Abstract

Posttranslational modifications in the form of covalently attached proteins like ubiquitin (Ub), were long considered an exclusive feature of eukaryotic organisms. The discovery of pupylation, the modification of lysine residues with a prokaryotic, ubiquitin-like protein (Pup), demonstrated that certain bacteria use a tagging pathway functionally related to ubiquitination in order to target proteins for proteasomal degradation. However, functional analogies do not translate into structural or mechanistic relatedness. Bacterial Pup, unlike eukaryotic Ub, does not adopt a β-grasp fold, but is intrinsically disordered. Furthermore, isopeptide bond formation in the pupylation process is carried out by enzymes evolutionary descendent from glutamine synthetases. While in eukaryotes, the proteasome is the main energy-dependent protein degradation machine, bacterial proteasomes exist in addition to other architecturally related degradation complexes, and their specific role along with the role of pupylation is still poorly understood. In Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the Pup-proteasome system contributes to pathogenicity by supporting the bacterium's persistence within host macrophages. Here, we describe the mechanism and structural framework of pupylation and the targeting of pupylated proteins to the proteasome complex. Particular attention is given to the comparison of the bacterial Pup-proteasome system and the eukaryotic ubiquitin-proteasome system. Furthermore, the involvement of pupylation and proteasomal degradation in Mtb pathogenesis is discussed together with efforts to establish the Pup-proteasome system as a drug target. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System.

Statistics

Citations

16 citations in Web of Science®
19 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Medical Microbiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:19 Sep 2013 11:34
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:59
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0006-3002
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.bbamcr.2013.03.022
PubMed ID:23557784

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations