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Controlling reaching movements with predictable and unpredictable target motion in 10-year-old children and adults


Daum, Moritz M; Huber, Susanne; Krist, Horst (2007). Controlling reaching movements with predictable and unpredictable target motion in 10-year-old children and adults. Experimental Brain Research, 177(4):483-492.

Abstract

We investigated interception behavior in adults and 10-year-old children. Participants had to intercept virtual targets moving on either a predictable (linear) or unpredictable (non-linear) path (with random direction changes). Targets moved at two different velocities, which varied randomly from trial to trial. Participants reached for the targets via a force-feedback device. Reaching movements for linearly moving targets in a block of linearly moving targets were compared with reaching movements for linearly moving targets in the context of non-linearly moving targets. Movement direction and maximum speed of the first sub-movement were analyzed as well as frequency of target hits and number of sub-movements. Unpredictable target motion caused faster movement speeds than predictable target motion for both children and adults. Additionally, unpredictable target motion caused children and adults to gear their initial movement direction further towards the current position of the target, while with predictable target motion, they geared their initial movement direction further ahead of the target towards an anticipated interception position. Together, these results suggest differential processing of predictable and unpredictable object behavior in an interception task, and that this differential processing is already in place in 10-year-olds.

Abstract

We investigated interception behavior in adults and 10-year-old children. Participants had to intercept virtual targets moving on either a predictable (linear) or unpredictable (non-linear) path (with random direction changes). Targets moved at two different velocities, which varied randomly from trial to trial. Participants reached for the targets via a force-feedback device. Reaching movements for linearly moving targets in a block of linearly moving targets were compared with reaching movements for linearly moving targets in the context of non-linearly moving targets. Movement direction and maximum speed of the first sub-movement were analyzed as well as frequency of target hits and number of sub-movements. Unpredictable target motion caused faster movement speeds than predictable target motion for both children and adults. Additionally, unpredictable target motion caused children and adults to gear their initial movement direction further towards the current position of the target, while with predictable target motion, they geared their initial movement direction further ahead of the target towards an anticipated interception position. Together, these results suggest differential processing of predictable and unpredictable object behavior in an interception task, and that this differential processing is already in place in 10-year-olds.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:150 Psychology
Language:English
Date:2007
Deposited On:20 Sep 2013 07:58
Last Modified:18 Feb 2018 13:09
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0014-4819
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-006-0704-3
PubMed ID:17006685

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