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Remodeling of tissue-engineered bone structures in vivo - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Hofmann, S; Hilbe, Monika; Fajardo, R; Hagenmüller, H; Nuss, Karl; Arras, Margarete; Müller, R; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kaplan, D L; Merkle, H P; Meinel, L (2013). Remodeling of tissue-engineered bone structures in vivo. European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics, 85(1):119-129.

Abstract

Implant design for bone regeneration is expected to be optimized when implant structures resemble the anatomical situation of the defect site. We tested the validity of this hypothesis by exploring the feasibility of generating different in vitro engineered bone-like structures originating from porous silk fibroin scaffolds decorated with RGD sequences (SF-RGD), seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Scaffolds with small (106-212μm), medium (212-300μm), and large pore diameter ranges (300-425μm) were seeded with hMSC and subsequently differentiated in vitro into bone-like tissue resembling initial scaffold geometries and featuring bone-like structures. Eight weeks after implantation into calvarial defects in mice, the in vitro engineered bone-like tissues had remodeled into bone featuring different proportions of woven/lamellar bone bridging the defects. Regardless of pore diameter, all implants integrated well, vascularization was advanced, and bone marrow ingrowth had started. Ultimately, in this defect model, the geometry of the in vitro generated tissue-engineered bone structure, trabecular- or plate-like, had no significant impact on the healing of the defect, owing to an efficient remodeling of its structure after implantation.

Abstract

Implant design for bone regeneration is expected to be optimized when implant structures resemble the anatomical situation of the defect site. We tested the validity of this hypothesis by exploring the feasibility of generating different in vitro engineered bone-like structures originating from porous silk fibroin scaffolds decorated with RGD sequences (SF-RGD), seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Scaffolds with small (106-212μm), medium (212-300μm), and large pore diameter ranges (300-425μm) were seeded with hMSC and subsequently differentiated in vitro into bone-like tissue resembling initial scaffold geometries and featuring bone-like structures. Eight weeks after implantation into calvarial defects in mice, the in vitro engineered bone-like tissues had remodeled into bone featuring different proportions of woven/lamellar bone bridging the defects. Regardless of pore diameter, all implants integrated well, vascularization was advanced, and bone marrow ingrowth had started. Ultimately, in this defect model, the geometry of the in vitro generated tissue-engineered bone structure, trabecular- or plate-like, had no significant impact on the healing of the defect, owing to an efficient remodeling of its structure after implantation.

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17 citations in Web of Science®
20 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Center for Applied Biotechnology and Molecular Medicine
05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:23 Sep 2013 07:10
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 16:59
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0939-6411
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejpb.2013.02.011
PubMed ID:23958323

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