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Generation of HIV-1-specific T cells by electroporation of T-cell receptor RNA


Hofmann, C; Harrer, T; Kubesch, V; Maurer, K; Metzner, K J; Eismann, K; Bergmann, S; Schmitt-Haendle, M; Schuler, G; Dörrie, J; Schaft, N (2008). Generation of HIV-1-specific T cells by electroporation of T-cell receptor RNA. AIDS, 22(13):1577-1582.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which recognize conserved epitopes of the virus, are correlated with prolonged survival of infected individuals. Unfortunately, most HIV-1-infected patients are unable to generate such an immune response. Antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be generated by T-cell receptor transfer. This is commonly done by retroviral transduction, which is complicated and poses the threat of stable genetic alteration of autologous cells. METHODS: We reprogrammed primary CD8+ T cells by electroporation of RNA, which encoded an HIV-1-pol- and an HIV-1-gag-specific T-cell receptor recognizing the human leukocyte antigen-A2 restricted epitopes ILKEPVHGV and SLYNTVATL, respectively. RESULTS: These reprogrammed cells specifically produced the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma after stimulation with target cells that presented the corresponding peptides, and were able to lyse these targets efficiently and specifically. The lytic avidities of the HIV-1-pol- and HIV-1-gag-TCR-RNA-electroporated CD8+ T cells were within the same range than those of the parental cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Most importantly, HIV-1-gag-reprogrammed T cells recognized target cells that presented endogenously processed antigen, which resulted in cytokine production and lysis. CONCLUSION: It is shown here for the first time that functional transfer of virus-specific T-cell receptors by RNA electroporation is feasible, and represents an innovative, safe, and easy method to generate virus-specific T cells, avoiding the risks of retroviral transduction.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: HIV-1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, which recognize conserved epitopes of the virus, are correlated with prolonged survival of infected individuals. Unfortunately, most HIV-1-infected patients are unable to generate such an immune response. Antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes can be generated by T-cell receptor transfer. This is commonly done by retroviral transduction, which is complicated and poses the threat of stable genetic alteration of autologous cells. METHODS: We reprogrammed primary CD8+ T cells by electroporation of RNA, which encoded an HIV-1-pol- and an HIV-1-gag-specific T-cell receptor recognizing the human leukocyte antigen-A2 restricted epitopes ILKEPVHGV and SLYNTVATL, respectively. RESULTS: These reprogrammed cells specifically produced the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interferon-gamma after stimulation with target cells that presented the corresponding peptides, and were able to lyse these targets efficiently and specifically. The lytic avidities of the HIV-1-pol- and HIV-1-gag-TCR-RNA-electroporated CD8+ T cells were within the same range than those of the parental cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Most importantly, HIV-1-gag-reprogrammed T cells recognized target cells that presented endogenously processed antigen, which resulted in cytokine production and lysis. CONCLUSION: It is shown here for the first time that functional transfer of virus-specific T-cell receptors by RNA electroporation is feasible, and represents an innovative, safe, and easy method to generate virus-specific T cells, avoiding the risks of retroviral transduction.

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10 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Infectious Diseases
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:20 August 2008
Deposited On:15 Dec 2008 15:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 12:42
Publisher:Lippincott Wiliams & Wilkins
ISSN:0269-9370
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1097/QAD.0b013e3283063a17
PubMed ID:18670216

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