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Feasibility of quantitative diffusion imaging of the heart in post-mortem MR


Crooijmans, Hendrikus J A; Ruder, Thomas D; Zech, Wolf-Dieter; Somaini-Mathier, Sandra; Scheffler, Klaus; Thali, Michael J; Bieri, Oliver (2013). Feasibility of quantitative diffusion imaging of the heart in post-mortem MR. Journal of Forensic Radiology and Imaging, 1(3):124-128.

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this work was to investigate the feasibility of quantitative diffusion imaging of the heart in a post-mortem setting and compare these results to standard T2-weighted imaging as well as to traditional autopsy and histological analysis. Materials and methods: Two human cadavers underwent post-mortem magnetic resonance (PMMR) imaging of the heart, autopsy and histological analysis of the myocardium. Diffusion weighted double-echo steady-state data with direction sensitivity in three orthogonal directions have been acquired from which the mean-diffusivity has been estimated. In addition, T2-weighted data have been acquired. PMMR images were compared to autopsy and histology. Results: Direction dependent diffusivity-maps revealed a strong dependency on the orientation of the myocardial fibers; the resulting mean-diffusivity-maps are independent of the fiber direction. Findings in the mean-diffusivity-maps revealed good correspondence to findings in T2-weighted images as well as to the autopsy and histology findings. Long axis reconstructions of the mean-diffusivity-maps gave further insight into the extent of an acute infarction of one case. Conclusions: This study shows that quantitative diffusion imaging of the heart is applicable in a post-mortem setting to identify scar-tissue as well as acute infarction in the myocardium. Three-dimensional isotropic diffusivity-mapping additionally allows for the reconstruction of slices in any orientation for optimal visualization of the results. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this work was to investigate the feasibility of quantitative diffusion imaging of the heart in a post-mortem setting and compare these results to standard T2-weighted imaging as well as to traditional autopsy and histological analysis. Materials and methods: Two human cadavers underwent post-mortem magnetic resonance (PMMR) imaging of the heart, autopsy and histological analysis of the myocardium. Diffusion weighted double-echo steady-state data with direction sensitivity in three orthogonal directions have been acquired from which the mean-diffusivity has been estimated. In addition, T2-weighted data have been acquired. PMMR images were compared to autopsy and histology. Results: Direction dependent diffusivity-maps revealed a strong dependency on the orientation of the myocardial fibers; the resulting mean-diffusivity-maps are independent of the fiber direction. Findings in the mean-diffusivity-maps revealed good correspondence to findings in T2-weighted images as well as to the autopsy and histology findings. Long axis reconstructions of the mean-diffusivity-maps gave further insight into the extent of an acute infarction of one case. Conclusions: This study shows that quantitative diffusion imaging of the heart is applicable in a post-mortem setting to identify scar-tissue as well as acute infarction in the myocardium. Three-dimensional isotropic diffusivity-mapping additionally allows for the reconstruction of slices in any orientation for optimal visualization of the results. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

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Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Legal Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:340 Law
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:24 Oct 2013 06:54
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:03
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:2212-4780
Additional Information:cited By (since 1996)0
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jofri.2013.05.009

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