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Visual print tuning deficits in dyslexic adolescents under minimized phonological demands


Kronschnabel, Jens; Schmid, Raffaella; Maurer, Urs; Brandeis, Daniel (2013). Visual print tuning deficits in dyslexic adolescents under minimized phonological demands. NeuroImage, 74:58-69.

Abstract

The left ventral occipitotemporal cortex is reliably activated by visual orthographic stimulation and has repeatedly been found underactivated in developmental dyslexia. However, previous studies have made little effort to specifically probe orthographic processing while minimizing the need for higher-order reading related operations, especially phonological processing. Phonological deficits are well documented in dyslexia but may limit interpretations of ventral occipitotemporal underactivation as a primarily orthographic coding deficit, considering that different processing modes occur highly parallel. We therefore used a task that restricts higher-order processing to better isolate orthographic deficits. Thirteen dyslexic adolescents and twenty-two matched typical readers performed a low-level target detection task combined with rapidly presented stimuli of increasing similarity to real words during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The clear deviance found in impaired readers' left ventral occipitotemporal organization suggested deficits in print sensitivity at bottom-up processing stages that are largely independent of phonological operations. This finding elucidates print processing during a critical developmental transition from child- to adulthood and extends current accounts on left ventral occipitotemporal functionality.

Abstract

The left ventral occipitotemporal cortex is reliably activated by visual orthographic stimulation and has repeatedly been found underactivated in developmental dyslexia. However, previous studies have made little effort to specifically probe orthographic processing while minimizing the need for higher-order reading related operations, especially phonological processing. Phonological deficits are well documented in dyslexia but may limit interpretations of ventral occipitotemporal underactivation as a primarily orthographic coding deficit, considering that different processing modes occur highly parallel. We therefore used a task that restricts higher-order processing to better isolate orthographic deficits. Thirteen dyslexic adolescents and twenty-two matched typical readers performed a low-level target detection task combined with rapidly presented stimuli of increasing similarity to real words during functional magnetic resonance imaging. The clear deviance found in impaired readers' left ventral occipitotemporal organization suggested deficits in print sensitivity at bottom-up processing stages that are largely independent of phonological operations. This finding elucidates print processing during a critical developmental transition from child- to adulthood and extends current accounts on left ventral occipitotemporal functionality.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Psychiatric University Hospital Zurich > Center for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
04 Faculty of Medicine > Neuroscience Center Zurich
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
150 Psychology
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPSYCH , Erstautor
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:23 Oct 2013 07:26
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2013.02.014
PubMed ID:23428569

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