Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Traffic-related air pollution correlates with adult-onset asthma among never-smokers


Künzli, N; Bridevaux, P O; Liu, L J S; Garcia-Esteban, R; Schindler, C; Gerbase, M W; Sunyer, J; Keidel, D; Rochat, T (2009). Traffic-related air pollution correlates with adult-onset asthma among never-smokers. Thorax, 64(8):664-670.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Traffic-related pollution is associated with the onset of asthma in children. Its effect on adult-onset asthma is poorly investigated. The SAPALDIA cohort study was used to investigate associations between the 11-year change (1991-2002) in home outdoor traffic-related particulate matter up to 10 microm in diameter (TPM(10)) and the incidence of asthma.
METHODS: Never-smokers without asthma at baseline aged 18-60 years in 1991 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Subjects reporting doctor-diagnosed asthma at follow-up were considered incident cases. TPM(10) at baseline and follow-up was predicted and interpolated to subjects' place of residence by dispersion models using emission and meteorological data. Cox proportional hazard models for time to asthma onset were adjusted (age, gender, baseline atopy, body mass index, bronchial reactivity, maternal allergies).
RESULTS: Of 2725 never-smokers, 41 reported asthma onset in 2002. Home outdoor TPM(10) concentrations improved during the interval (mean -0.6; range -9 to +7.2; IQR 0.6 microg/m(3)). The incidence of asthma was associated with a change in TPM(10). The hazard ratio (1.30; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.61) per 1 microg/m(3) change in TPM(10) (IQR) was not sensitive to further adjustments (education, workplace exposure, passive smoking, parental asthma or allergies, random area effects, lung function or co-pollutants such as regional, secondary, total PM(10) or proximity to busy roads).
CONCLUSION: The data suggest a role for traffic-related pollution in adult-onset asthma. Space, time and source-specific individual assignment of exposure to traffic-related pollution is a key strength of SAPALDIA. It may explain why findings were statistically significant despite the limited number of new cases. As traffic-related pollution prevails, the finding may be of substantial public health relevance.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Traffic-related pollution is associated with the onset of asthma in children. Its effect on adult-onset asthma is poorly investigated. The SAPALDIA cohort study was used to investigate associations between the 11-year change (1991-2002) in home outdoor traffic-related particulate matter up to 10 microm in diameter (TPM(10)) and the incidence of asthma.
METHODS: Never-smokers without asthma at baseline aged 18-60 years in 1991 were eligible for inclusion in the study. Subjects reporting doctor-diagnosed asthma at follow-up were considered incident cases. TPM(10) at baseline and follow-up was predicted and interpolated to subjects' place of residence by dispersion models using emission and meteorological data. Cox proportional hazard models for time to asthma onset were adjusted (age, gender, baseline atopy, body mass index, bronchial reactivity, maternal allergies).
RESULTS: Of 2725 never-smokers, 41 reported asthma onset in 2002. Home outdoor TPM(10) concentrations improved during the interval (mean -0.6; range -9 to +7.2; IQR 0.6 microg/m(3)). The incidence of asthma was associated with a change in TPM(10). The hazard ratio (1.30; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.61) per 1 microg/m(3) change in TPM(10) (IQR) was not sensitive to further adjustments (education, workplace exposure, passive smoking, parental asthma or allergies, random area effects, lung function or co-pollutants such as regional, secondary, total PM(10) or proximity to busy roads).
CONCLUSION: The data suggest a role for traffic-related pollution in adult-onset asthma. Space, time and source-specific individual assignment of exposure to traffic-related pollution is a key strength of SAPALDIA. It may explain why findings were statistically significant despite the limited number of new cases. As traffic-related pollution prevails, the finding may be of substantial public health relevance.

Statistics

Citations

73 citations in Web of Science®
83 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Clinical Chemistry
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
540 Chemistry
Language:English
Date:2009
Deposited On:29 Oct 2013 08:11
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:04
Publisher:BMJ Publishing Group
ISSN:0040-6376
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1136/thx.2008.110031
PubMed ID:19359271

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations