Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Coronary artery stent imaging with CT using an integrated electronics detector and iterative reconstructions: First in vitro experience


von Spiczak, Jochen; Morsbach, Fabian; Winklhofer, Sebastian; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Leschka, Sebastian; Flohr, Thomas; Maintz, David; Seifarth, Harald; Bunck, Alexander C; Stolzmann, Paul; Alkadhi, Hatem (2013). Coronary artery stent imaging with CT using an integrated electronics detector and iterative reconstructions: First in vitro experience. Journal of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography, 7(4):215-222.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite continuous improvements in CT technology, accurate stent lumen delineation remains challenging.
PURPOSE: The aim was to evaluate the quality of coronary stent lumen delineation with CT using a detector with integrated electronics.
METHODS: Twelve coronary stents placed in plastic tubes and filled with contrast agent (CT number 250 HU) were imaged with either a 128-section dual-source CT machine equipped with conventional detector or with integrated electronics. On both scanners, images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (slice thickness 0.6 mm; increment 0.4 mm) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (slice thickness 0.6 mm; increment 0.4 mm), and with iterative reconstruction (slice thickness 0.5 mm; increment 0.3 mm) on the integrated scanner. Two blinded, independent readers assessed image quality, noise, in-stent diameter, in-stent attenuation, and image sharpness by using signal intensity profiles across stents.
RESULTS: Interreader agreement for image quality assessment was substantial (κ = 0.798). Both readers rated best image quality in data sets from integrated detector at highest spatial resolution (86 or 72% of stents rated best quality). Image noise was significantly lower in data sets scanned with integrated detector, being lowest at 0.6 mm slice thickness (14.3 vs 21.0 HU; P < .001). Differences between measured and true in-stent diameters and differences in attenuation across stents were smallest, and average/maximum image sharpness was highest in data sets from the integrated detector using iterative reconstructions.
CONCLUSION: CT coronary stent imaging is significantly improved by using a detector with integrated electronics combined with iterative reconstructions.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Despite continuous improvements in CT technology, accurate stent lumen delineation remains challenging.
PURPOSE: The aim was to evaluate the quality of coronary stent lumen delineation with CT using a detector with integrated electronics.
METHODS: Twelve coronary stents placed in plastic tubes and filled with contrast agent (CT number 250 HU) were imaged with either a 128-section dual-source CT machine equipped with conventional detector or with integrated electronics. On both scanners, images were reconstructed with filtered back projection (slice thickness 0.6 mm; increment 0.4 mm) and sinogram-affirmed iterative reconstruction (slice thickness 0.6 mm; increment 0.4 mm), and with iterative reconstruction (slice thickness 0.5 mm; increment 0.3 mm) on the integrated scanner. Two blinded, independent readers assessed image quality, noise, in-stent diameter, in-stent attenuation, and image sharpness by using signal intensity profiles across stents.
RESULTS: Interreader agreement for image quality assessment was substantial (κ = 0.798). Both readers rated best image quality in data sets from integrated detector at highest spatial resolution (86 or 72% of stents rated best quality). Image noise was significantly lower in data sets scanned with integrated detector, being lowest at 0.6 mm slice thickness (14.3 vs 21.0 HU; P < .001). Differences between measured and true in-stent diameters and differences in attenuation across stents were smallest, and average/maximum image sharpness was highest in data sets from the integrated detector using iterative reconstructions.
CONCLUSION: CT coronary stent imaging is significantly improved by using a detector with integrated electronics combined with iterative reconstructions.

Statistics

Citations

10 citations in Web of Science®
12 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:29 Oct 2013 14:59
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:04
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1876-861X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcct.2013.08.003
PubMed ID:24148775

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Article Networks

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations