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Conserving large populations of lions - the argument for fences has holes


Creel, S; Breitenmoser, C; Cozzi, G; Stanley-Price, M; et al (2013). Conserving large populations of lions - the argument for fences has holes. Ecology Letters, 16(11):1413-e3.

Abstract

Packer et al. reported that fenced lion populations attain densities closer to carrying capacity than unfenced populations. However, fenced populations are often maintained above carrying capacity, and most are small. Many more lions are conserved per dollar invested in unfenced ecosystems, which avoid the ecological and economic costs of fencing.

Abstract

Packer et al. reported that fenced lion populations attain densities closer to carrying capacity than unfenced populations. However, fenced populations are often maintained above carrying capacity, and most are small. Many more lions are conserved per dollar invested in unfenced ecosystems, which avoid the ecological and economic costs of fencing.

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20 citations in Web of Science®
24 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:07 Nov 2013 15:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:06
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:1461-023X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/ele.12145
Official URL:http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/ele.12145/abstract

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