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Pancreatic stone protein predicts positive sputum bacteriology in exacerbations of COPD


Scherr, Andreas; Graf, Rolf; Bain, Martha; Christ-Crain, Mirjam; Müller, Beat; Tamm, Michael; Stolz, Daiana (2013). Pancreatic stone protein predicts positive sputum bacteriology in exacerbations of COPD. Chest, 143(2):379-387.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pancreatic stone protein/regenerating protein (PSP/reg) serum levels are supposed to be increased in bacterial inflammation. PSP/reg levels also might be useful, therefore, as a predictor of bacterial infection in COPD. METHODS: Two hundred consecutive patients presenting to the ED due to acute exacerbation of COPD were prospectively assessed. Patients were evaluated based on clinical, laboratory, and lung functional parameters at admission (exacerbation) and after short-term follow-up (14-21 days). PSP/reg serum values were measured by a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: PSP/reg levels were elevated in subjects with COPD exacerbation (23.8 ng/mL; 95% CI, 17.1-32.7) when compared with those with stable disease (19.1 ng/mL; 95% CI, 14.1-30.4; P 5 .03) and healthy control subjects (14.0 ng/mL; 95% CI , 12.0-19.0; P , .01). Higher PSP/reg values were observed in exacerbations with positive sputum bacteriology compared with those with negative sputum bacteriology (26.1 ng/mL [95% CI, 19.2-38.1] vs 20.8 ng/mL [95% CI , 15.6-27.2]; P , .01). Multivariate regression analysis revealed PSP/reg level as an independent predictor of positive sputum bacteriology. A combination of a PSP/reg cutoff value of . 33.9 ng/mL and presence of discolored sputum had a specificity of 97% to identify patients with pathogenic bacteria on sputum culture. In contrast, PSP/reg levels , 18.4 ng/mL and nonpurulent sputum ruled out positive bacterial sputum culture (sensitivity, 92%). In survival analysis, high PSP/reg levels at hospital admission were associated with increased 2-year mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Serum PSP/reg level might represent a promising new biomarker to identify bacterial etiology of COPD exacerbation.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pancreatic stone protein/regenerating protein (PSP/reg) serum levels are supposed to be increased in bacterial inflammation. PSP/reg levels also might be useful, therefore, as a predictor of bacterial infection in COPD. METHODS: Two hundred consecutive patients presenting to the ED due to acute exacerbation of COPD were prospectively assessed. Patients were evaluated based on clinical, laboratory, and lung functional parameters at admission (exacerbation) and after short-term follow-up (14-21 days). PSP/reg serum values were measured by a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. RESULTS: PSP/reg levels were elevated in subjects with COPD exacerbation (23.8 ng/mL; 95% CI, 17.1-32.7) when compared with those with stable disease (19.1 ng/mL; 95% CI, 14.1-30.4; P 5 .03) and healthy control subjects (14.0 ng/mL; 95% CI , 12.0-19.0; P , .01). Higher PSP/reg values were observed in exacerbations with positive sputum bacteriology compared with those with negative sputum bacteriology (26.1 ng/mL [95% CI, 19.2-38.1] vs 20.8 ng/mL [95% CI , 15.6-27.2]; P , .01). Multivariate regression analysis revealed PSP/reg level as an independent predictor of positive sputum bacteriology. A combination of a PSP/reg cutoff value of . 33.9 ng/mL and presence of discolored sputum had a specificity of 97% to identify patients with pathogenic bacteria on sputum culture. In contrast, PSP/reg levels , 18.4 ng/mL and nonpurulent sputum ruled out positive bacterial sputum culture (sensitivity, 92%). In survival analysis, high PSP/reg levels at hospital admission were associated with increased 2-year mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Serum PSP/reg level might represent a promising new biomarker to identify bacterial etiology of COPD exacerbation.

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11 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Division of Surgical Research
04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Visceral and Transplantation Surgery
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:08 Nov 2013 09:56
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 23:31
Publisher:American College of Chest Physicians
ISSN:0012-3692
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1378/chest.12-0730
PubMed ID:22922487

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