Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Genotype-temperature interactions on larval performance shape population structure in hybridogenetic water frogs (Pelophylax esculentus complex)


Pruvost, Nicolas B M; Hollinger, Daniel; Reyer, Heinz-Ulrich (2013). Genotype-temperature interactions on larval performance shape population structure in hybridogenetic water frogs (Pelophylax esculentus complex). Functional Ecology, 27:459-471.

Abstract

1.The evolutionary potential and ecological importance of interspecific hybrids continues to be a controversial issue. Traditionally, hybridization–often associated with polyploidy and clonal reproduction –was considered an important mechanism for speciation in plants, but not in animals. More recently, investigations have shifted to the question: Under which genetic and ecological conditions do hybrid taxa and different ploidies arise and succeed, and when and where do they fail? Finding answers to this question is aggravated by the fact that suitable taxa for such studies are often far apart on the phylogenetic tree. Hence, results are influenced by many confounding variables. 2.In this study, we reduce this problem by investigating the fitness within a complex of three closely related water frog taxa consisting of the two sexually reproducing parental speciesPelophylax lessonae(genotype LL) and P. ridibundus(RR) plus their interspecific hybrid P. esculentus which comes in three ploidy types (LR, LLR and LRR), as well as with sexual and hemiclonal reproduction. Offspring of all five genotypes were produced by artificially crossing adults sampled from populations in Slovakia, Germany and Switzerland. This created genetic variation. They were then raised at two temperature levels: 18 and 24°C. This created ecological variation. Larval performance under the two temperature regimes was analysed with respect to three fitness-related parameters: survival rate, days to metamorphosis and weight at tail resorption. 3.Survival rate was significantly higher for offspring of the three hybrid types (LR, LLR and LRR) compared with those of the parental species (LL, RR), at both rearing temperatures. For days to metamorphosis and weight at metamorphosis, we found an interaction between offspring type and temperature. In both cases, performance of hybrid and parental offspring did not differ at 24°C, but at 18°C hybrids metamorphosed faster and at a lower weight than parentals. 4.We discuss these results in relation to those from other studies and conclude that under cold conditions hybrids (especially the two triploid types) have higher fitness than both parental species. This genotype9environment interaction could be one reason why all-hybrid populations mainly occur at the cooler northern range of the water frog distribution.

Abstract

1.The evolutionary potential and ecological importance of interspecific hybrids continues to be a controversial issue. Traditionally, hybridization–often associated with polyploidy and clonal reproduction –was considered an important mechanism for speciation in plants, but not in animals. More recently, investigations have shifted to the question: Under which genetic and ecological conditions do hybrid taxa and different ploidies arise and succeed, and when and where do they fail? Finding answers to this question is aggravated by the fact that suitable taxa for such studies are often far apart on the phylogenetic tree. Hence, results are influenced by many confounding variables. 2.In this study, we reduce this problem by investigating the fitness within a complex of three closely related water frog taxa consisting of the two sexually reproducing parental speciesPelophylax lessonae(genotype LL) and P. ridibundus(RR) plus their interspecific hybrid P. esculentus which comes in three ploidy types (LR, LLR and LRR), as well as with sexual and hemiclonal reproduction. Offspring of all five genotypes were produced by artificially crossing adults sampled from populations in Slovakia, Germany and Switzerland. This created genetic variation. They were then raised at two temperature levels: 18 and 24°C. This created ecological variation. Larval performance under the two temperature regimes was analysed with respect to three fitness-related parameters: survival rate, days to metamorphosis and weight at tail resorption. 3.Survival rate was significantly higher for offspring of the three hybrid types (LR, LLR and LRR) compared with those of the parental species (LL, RR), at both rearing temperatures. For days to metamorphosis and weight at metamorphosis, we found an interaction between offspring type and temperature. In both cases, performance of hybrid and parental offspring did not differ at 24°C, but at 18°C hybrids metamorphosed faster and at a lower weight than parentals. 4.We discuss these results in relation to those from other studies and conclude that under cold conditions hybrids (especially the two triploid types) have higher fitness than both parental species. This genotype9environment interaction could be one reason why all-hybrid populations mainly occur at the cooler northern range of the water frog distribution.

Statistics

Citations

6 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 15 Nov 2013
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Evolutionary Biology and Environmental Studies
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
590 Animals (Zoology)
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:15 Nov 2013 15:09
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:09
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0269-8463
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2435.12049

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 401kB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations