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Radiolabeling and in vitro /in vivo evaluation of N-(1-adamantyl)-8-methoxy-4-oxo-1-phenyl-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide as a PET probe for imaging cannabinoid type 2 receptor.


Mu, Linjing; Bieri, Daniel; Slavik, Roger; Drandarov, Konstantin; Müller, Adrienne; Cermak, Stjepko; Weber, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Ametamey, Simon M (2013). Radiolabeling and in vitro /in vivo evaluation of N-(1-adamantyl)-8-methoxy-4-oxo-1-phenyl-1,4-dihydroquinoline-3-carboxamide as a PET probe for imaging cannabinoid type 2 receptor. Journal of Neurochemistry, 126(5):616-24.

Abstract

The cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor plays an important role in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease and is therefore a very promising target for therapeutic approaches as well as for imaging. Based on the literature, we identified one 4-oxoquinoline derivative(designated KD2) as the lead structure. It was synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated as a potential imaging tracer for CB2. [11C]KD2 was obtained in 99% radiochemical purity.Moderate blood–brain barrier (BBB) passage was predicted for KD2 from an in vitro transport assay with P-glycoprotein-transfected Madin Darby canine kidney cells. No efflux of KD2 by P-glycoprotein was detected. In vitro autoradiography of rat and mouse spleen slices demonstrated that [11C]KD2 exhibits high specific binding towards CB2. High spleen uptake of [11C]KD2 was observed in dynamic positron emission tomography(PET) studies with Wistar rats and its specificity was confirmed by displacement study with a selective CB2 agonist, GW405833. A pilot autoradiography study with post-mortem spinal cord slices from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)patients with [11C]KD2 suggested the presence of CB2 receptors under disease conditions. Specificity of [11C]KD2 binding could also be demonstrated on these human tissues. In conclusion, [11C]KD2 shows good in vitro and in vivo properties as a potential PET tracer for CB2.

Abstract

The cannabinoid type 2 (CB2) receptor plays an important role in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and Alzheimer’s disease and is therefore a very promising target for therapeutic approaches as well as for imaging. Based on the literature, we identified one 4-oxoquinoline derivative(designated KD2) as the lead structure. It was synthesized, radiolabeled and evaluated as a potential imaging tracer for CB2. [11C]KD2 was obtained in 99% radiochemical purity.Moderate blood–brain barrier (BBB) passage was predicted for KD2 from an in vitro transport assay with P-glycoprotein-transfected Madin Darby canine kidney cells. No efflux of KD2 by P-glycoprotein was detected. In vitro autoradiography of rat and mouse spleen slices demonstrated that [11C]KD2 exhibits high specific binding towards CB2. High spleen uptake of [11C]KD2 was observed in dynamic positron emission tomography(PET) studies with Wistar rats and its specificity was confirmed by displacement study with a selective CB2 agonist, GW405833. A pilot autoradiography study with post-mortem spinal cord slices from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS)patients with [11C]KD2 suggested the presence of CB2 receptors under disease conditions. Specificity of [11C]KD2 binding could also be demonstrated on these human tissues. In conclusion, [11C]KD2 shows good in vitro and in vivo properties as a potential PET tracer for CB2.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Nuclear Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2013
Deposited On:18 Nov 2013 10:32
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 23:47
Publisher:Wiley-Blackwell
ISSN:0022-3042
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1111/jnc.12354
PubMed ID:23795580

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