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Sleep deprivation increases dorsal nexus connectivity to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in humans


Bosch, Oliver G; Rihm, Julia S; Scheidegger, Milan; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Stämpfli, Philipp; Brakowski, Janis; Esposito, Fabrizio; Rasch, Björn; Seifritz, Erich (2013). Sleep deprivation increases dorsal nexus connectivity to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex in humans. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(48):19597-19602.

Abstract

In many patients with major depressive disorder, sleep deprivation, or wake therapy, induces an immediate but often transient antidepressant response. It is known from brain imaging studies that changes in anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity correlate with a relief of depression symptoms. Recently, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that brain network connectivity via the dorsal nexus (DN), a cortical area in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, is dramatically increased in depressed patients. To investigate whether an alteration in DN connectivity could provide a biomarker of therapy response and to determine brain mechanisms of action underlying sleep deprivations antidepressant effects, we examined its influence on resting state default mode network and DN connectivity in healthy humans. Our findings show that sleep deprivation reduced functional connectivity between posterior cingulate cortex and bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann area 32), and enhanced connectivity between DN and distinct areas in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10). These findings are consistent with resolution of dysfunctional brain network connectivity changes observed in depression and suggest changes in prefrontal connectivity with the DN as a brain mechanism of antidepressant therapy action.

Abstract

In many patients with major depressive disorder, sleep deprivation, or wake therapy, induces an immediate but often transient antidepressant response. It is known from brain imaging studies that changes in anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex activity correlate with a relief of depression symptoms. Recently, resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging revealed that brain network connectivity via the dorsal nexus (DN), a cortical area in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, is dramatically increased in depressed patients. To investigate whether an alteration in DN connectivity could provide a biomarker of therapy response and to determine brain mechanisms of action underlying sleep deprivations antidepressant effects, we examined its influence on resting state default mode network and DN connectivity in healthy humans. Our findings show that sleep deprivation reduced functional connectivity between posterior cingulate cortex and bilateral anterior cingulate cortex (Brodmann area 32), and enhanced connectivity between DN and distinct areas in right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10). These findings are consistent with resolution of dysfunctional brain network connectivity changes observed in depression and suggest changes in prefrontal connectivity with the DN as a brain mechanism of antidepressant therapy action.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology
07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Pharmacology and Toxicology

06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Psychology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
150 Psychology
610 Medicine & health
Uncontrolled Keywords:DoktoratPsych
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:19 Nov 2013 12:43
Last Modified:26 Sep 2017 19:57
Publisher:National Academy of Sciences
ISSN:0027-8424
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.1317010110
PubMed ID:24218598

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