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Bon religion in 11th–12th century Amdo: A case of Kyangphag Mula Drungmu (sKyang ’phags mu la drung mu) - Zurich Open Repository and Archive


Berounský, Daniel (2013). Bon religion in 11th–12th century Amdo: A case of Kyangphag Mula Drungmu (sKyang ’phags mu la drung mu). Asiatische Studien / Études Asiatiques, 67(3):783-808.

Abstract

Despite the legendary narrations of Bonpo chronicles about the mythical past, some Bonpo masters of flesh and bones start to appear only from the turn of the first millenium onwards. There is a legend that Zhugom Trulzhig (Zhu sgom ’khrul zhig, 11th century) traveled from Central Tibet to Amdo and became a teacher of eighteen so-called zhigpo (zhig po). These zhigpo represent non-celibate ascetics or “crazy yogis” whose teachings were transmitted through the family lineages. Though at least two monastic communities in Amdo linked their origins to the alleged disciples of Zhugom Trulzhig, the legend seems to exaggarate. The early Bonpo masters from Amdo are also grouped into the triad called “three elevated ones” (’phags pa gsum). One of them is a certain Kyangphag (sKyang ’phags), who is the main focus of this article. Three texts that are allegedly composed by him might provide a glance into the lives and teachings of the early Bonpo masters in Amdo.

Abstract

Despite the legendary narrations of Bonpo chronicles about the mythical past, some Bonpo masters of flesh and bones start to appear only from the turn of the first millenium onwards. There is a legend that Zhugom Trulzhig (Zhu sgom ’khrul zhig, 11th century) traveled from Central Tibet to Amdo and became a teacher of eighteen so-called zhigpo (zhig po). These zhigpo represent non-celibate ascetics or “crazy yogis” whose teachings were transmitted through the family lineages. Though at least two monastic communities in Amdo linked their origins to the alleged disciples of Zhugom Trulzhig, the legend seems to exaggarate. The early Bonpo masters from Amdo are also grouped into the triad called “three elevated ones” (’phags pa gsum). One of them is a certain Kyangphag (sKyang ’phags), who is the main focus of this article. Three texts that are allegedly composed by him might provide a glance into the lives and teachings of the early Bonpo masters in Amdo.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:Journals > Asiatische Studien / Études Asiatiques > Archive > 67 (2013) > 3
Dewey Decimal Classification:Unspecified
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:18 Nov 2013 16:20
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:09
Publisher:Schweizerische Asiengesellschaft / Verlag Peter Lang
ISSN:0004-4717
Related URLs:http://www.sagw.ch/de/asiengesellschaft/publikationen/Asiatische-Studien.html (Publisher)
http://www.peterlang.com/index.cfm?vID=86850&vLang=D&vHR=1&vUR=4&vUUR=11 (Publisher)

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