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Brain signal variability relates to stability of behavior after recovery from diffuse brain injury


Raja Beharelle, Anjali; Kovačević, Natasa; McIntosh, Anthony R; Levine, Brian (2012). Brain signal variability relates to stability of behavior after recovery from diffuse brain injury. NeuroImage, 60(2):1528-1537.

Abstract

Variability or noise is an unmistakable feature of neural signals; however such fluctuations have been regarded as not carrying meaningful information or as detrimental for neural processes. Recent empirical and computational work has shown that neural systems with a greater capacity for information processing are able to explore a more varied dynamic repertoire, and the hallmark of this is increased irregularity or variability in the neural signal. How this variability in neural dynamics affects behavior remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of variability of magnetoencephalography signals in supporting healthy cognitive functioning, measured by performance on an attention task, in healthy adults and in patients with traumatic brain injury. As an index of variability, we calculated multiscale entropy, which quantifies the temporal predictability of a time series across progressively more coarse time scales. We found lower variability in traumatic brain injury patients compared to controls, arguing against the idea that greater variability reflects dysfunctional neural processing. Furthermore, higher brain signal variability indicated improved behavioral performance for all participants. This relationship was statistically stronger for people with brain injury, demonstrating that those with higher brain signal variability were also those who had recovered the most cognitive ability. Rather than impede neural processing, cortical signal variability within an optimal range enables the exploration of diverse functional configurations, and may therefore play a vital role in healthy brain function.

Abstract

Variability or noise is an unmistakable feature of neural signals; however such fluctuations have been regarded as not carrying meaningful information or as detrimental for neural processes. Recent empirical and computational work has shown that neural systems with a greater capacity for information processing are able to explore a more varied dynamic repertoire, and the hallmark of this is increased irregularity or variability in the neural signal. How this variability in neural dynamics affects behavior remains unclear. Here, we investigated the role of variability of magnetoencephalography signals in supporting healthy cognitive functioning, measured by performance on an attention task, in healthy adults and in patients with traumatic brain injury. As an index of variability, we calculated multiscale entropy, which quantifies the temporal predictability of a time series across progressively more coarse time scales. We found lower variability in traumatic brain injury patients compared to controls, arguing against the idea that greater variability reflects dysfunctional neural processing. Furthermore, higher brain signal variability indicated improved behavioral performance for all participants. This relationship was statistically stronger for people with brain injury, demonstrating that those with higher brain signal variability were also those who had recovered the most cognitive ability. Rather than impede neural processing, cortical signal variability within an optimal range enables the exploration of diverse functional configurations, and may therefore play a vital role in healthy brain function.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:03 Faculty of Economics > Department of Economics
Dewey Decimal Classification:330 Economics
Language:English
Date:2012
Deposited On:22 Nov 2013 09:35
Last Modified:07 Dec 2017 23:53
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1053-8119
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.01.037
PubMed ID:22261371

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