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Inducing the contextual and prior polarity of nouns from the induced polarity preference of verbs


Klenner, Manfred; Petrakis, Stefanos (2014). Inducing the contextual and prior polarity of nouns from the induced polarity preference of verbs. Data & Knowledge Engineering, 90:13-21.

Abstract

The current endeavour focuses on the notion of positive versus negative polarity preferences of verbs for their direct objects. We observed verbs with a relatively clear positive or negative polarity preference (called polar), as well as cases of verbs where positive and negative polarity preference is balanced (called bi-polar). These polarity preferences of verbs are induced on the basis of a large dependency-parsed corpus by means of statistical measures and a lexicon of manually curated prior noun polarities. Given (learned) polar verbs, the contextual polarity of their direct objects can be derived. We reached a lower bound of 81.97% and an upper bound of 93.34% precision in these experiments. The polarity of a noun was predicted by the majority vote of the verbs that take that noun as its direct object in our corpus. In a second experimental setting,1 we also considered the role of neutral nouns co-occurring with these verbs. We found that the induction of the (tripartite) prior polarity of nouns can be achieved with a precision of 75.97%.

Abstract

The current endeavour focuses on the notion of positive versus negative polarity preferences of verbs for their direct objects. We observed verbs with a relatively clear positive or negative polarity preference (called polar), as well as cases of verbs where positive and negative polarity preference is balanced (called bi-polar). These polarity preferences of verbs are induced on the basis of a large dependency-parsed corpus by means of statistical measures and a lexicon of manually curated prior noun polarities. Given (learned) polar verbs, the contextual polarity of their direct objects can be derived. We reached a lower bound of 81.97% and an upper bound of 93.34% precision in these experiments. The polarity of a noun was predicted by the majority vote of the verbs that take that noun as its direct object in our corpus. In a second experimental setting,1 we also considered the role of neutral nouns co-occurring with these verbs. We found that the induction of the (tripartite) prior polarity of nouns can be achieved with a precision of 75.97%.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Computational Linguistics
Dewey Decimal Classification:000 Computer science, knowledge & systems
410 Linguistics
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:02 Dec 2013 13:55
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:12
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0169-023X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.datak.2013.09.002
Official URL:http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169023X13001055

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