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Pasteurella multocida infection in cats: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management


Lloret, Albert; Egberink, Herman; Addie, Diane; Belák, Sándor; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Frymus, Tadeusz; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hartmann, Katrin; Hosie, Margaret J; Lutz, Hans; Marsilio, Fulvio; Möstl, Karin; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Horzinek, Marian C (2013). Pasteurella multocida infection in cats: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 15(7):570-572.

Abstract

OVERVIEW: Pasteurella species are part of the normal oral flora of cats. They are also a common cause of infection in this species and an important zoonotic agent. INFECTION IN CATS: Pasteurella species are commonly isolated from subcutaneous abscesses and pyothorax in cats. They may also cause secondary lower respiratory tract infection and have been associated with spinal empyema and meningoencephalomyelitis. INFECTION IN HUMANS: Disease in humans mainly occurs after a cat bite or scratch, but may also be transmitted via respiratory secretions from cats in close contact with a person. Signs of local infection after a cat bite appear in a few hours (3-6 h). Severe disease and a fatal outcome mostly occur in immunocompromised people, but have also been reported in immunocompetent healthy individuals. Cat ownership by immunocompromised people may carry a risk.

Abstract

OVERVIEW: Pasteurella species are part of the normal oral flora of cats. They are also a common cause of infection in this species and an important zoonotic agent. INFECTION IN CATS: Pasteurella species are commonly isolated from subcutaneous abscesses and pyothorax in cats. They may also cause secondary lower respiratory tract infection and have been associated with spinal empyema and meningoencephalomyelitis. INFECTION IN HUMANS: Disease in humans mainly occurs after a cat bite or scratch, but may also be transmitted via respiratory secretions from cats in close contact with a person. Signs of local infection after a cat bite appear in a few hours (3-6 h). Severe disease and a fatal outcome mostly occur in immunocompromised people, but have also been reported in immunocompetent healthy individuals. Cat ownership by immunocompromised people may carry a risk.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:17 Feb 2014 11:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:13
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1098-612X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1098612X13489215
PubMed ID:23813817

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