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Coxiellosis/Q fever in cats: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management


Abstract

OVERVIEW: Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii. Farm animals and pets are the main reservoirs of infection.
INFECTION: Cats become infected by ingestion or inhalation of organisms from contaminated carcases of farm animals, or tick bites. Infection is common, as shown by several serological studies.
CLINICAL SIGNS: Experimentally, fever, anorexia and lethargy have been noted. In the field, infection usually remains subclinical. Abortion might occur. C burnetii has been isolated from the placenta of aborting cats, but also from cats experiencing normal parturition.
DIAGNOSIS: Infection with C burnetii can be diagnosed by isolation of the agent or serology.
PREVENTION: Most important is the potential zoonotic risk. Cats suspected of having been exposed to C burnetii might shed organisms during parturition. Wearing gloves and a mask when attending parturient or aborting cats can minimise the risk of infection. Tick prevention is recommended.

Abstract

OVERVIEW: Q fever is a zoonotic disease caused by Coxiella burnetii. Farm animals and pets are the main reservoirs of infection.
INFECTION: Cats become infected by ingestion or inhalation of organisms from contaminated carcases of farm animals, or tick bites. Infection is common, as shown by several serological studies.
CLINICAL SIGNS: Experimentally, fever, anorexia and lethargy have been noted. In the field, infection usually remains subclinical. Abortion might occur. C burnetii has been isolated from the placenta of aborting cats, but also from cats experiencing normal parturition.
DIAGNOSIS: Infection with C burnetii can be diagnosed by isolation of the agent or serology.
PREVENTION: Most important is the potential zoonotic risk. Cats suspected of having been exposed to C burnetii might shed organisms during parturition. Wearing gloves and a mask when attending parturient or aborting cats can minimise the risk of infection. Tick prevention is recommended.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:17 Feb 2014 11:12
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:13
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1098-612X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1098612X13489216
PubMed ID:23813818

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