Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Capnocytophaga canimorsus infection in cats: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management


Lloret, Albert; Egberink, Herman; Addie, Diane; Belák, Sándor; Boucraut-Baralon, Corine; Frymus, Tadeusz; Pennisi, Maria Grazia; Gruffydd-Jones, Tim; Hartmann, Katrin; Hosie, Margaret J; Lutz, Hans; Marsilio, Fulvio; Möstl, Karin; Radford, Alan D; Thiry, Etienne; Truyen, Uwe; Horzinek, Marian C (2013). Capnocytophaga canimorsus infection in cats: ABCD guidelines on prevention and management. Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, 15(7):588-590.

Abstract

OVERVIEW: Capnocytophaga canimorsus and Capnocytophaga cynodegmi are part of the normal bacterial flora of the oral cavity of dogs and cats. C canimorsus is more pathogenic and causes more severe infections in humans.
INFECTION: Disease is less frequently seen after a cat bite, scratch or close contact than after dog contacts. Serious disease has been reported in people, especially associated with immunocompromise and alcoholism. Disease in cats is not well documented; two cases of respiratory infection have been associated with the presence of these bacteria.
DIAGNOSIS: Diagnosis is based on culture in specific media, but these are slow growing bacteria; polymerase chain reaction and sequencing may aid in diagnosis and species identification.
TREATMENT: Penicillin or beta-lactams are the treatment options of choice. ZOONOTIC POTENTIAL: Based on incidence surveys, the zoonotic potential is low. The risk may be higher for immunocompromised persons, where dog and cat ownership must be discussed.

Abstract

OVERVIEW: Capnocytophaga canimorsus and Capnocytophaga cynodegmi are part of the normal bacterial flora of the oral cavity of dogs and cats. C canimorsus is more pathogenic and causes more severe infections in humans.
INFECTION: Disease is less frequently seen after a cat bite, scratch or close contact than after dog contacts. Serious disease has been reported in people, especially associated with immunocompromise and alcoholism. Disease in cats is not well documented; two cases of respiratory infection have been associated with the presence of these bacteria.
DIAGNOSIS: Diagnosis is based on culture in specific media, but these are slow growing bacteria; polymerase chain reaction and sequencing may aid in diagnosis and species identification.
TREATMENT: Penicillin or beta-lactams are the treatment options of choice. ZOONOTIC POTENTIAL: Based on incidence surveys, the zoonotic potential is low. The risk may be higher for immunocompromised persons, where dog and cat ownership must be discussed.

Statistics

Citations

Dimensions.ai Metrics
1 citation in Web of Science®
1 citation in Scopus®
2 citations in Microsoft Academic
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Department of Farm Animals
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:17 Feb 2014 11:16
Last Modified:16 Feb 2018 18:31
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1098-612X
OA Status:Closed
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/1098612X13489220
PubMed ID:23813822

Download

Full text not available from this repository.
View at publisher

Get full-text in a library