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Swiss analysis of multiple sclerosis: a multicenter, non-interventional, retrospective cohort study of disease-modifying therapies


Gobbi, C; Zecca, C; Linnebank, M; Müller, S; You, X; Meier, R; Borter, E; Traber, M (2013). Swiss analysis of multiple sclerosis: a multicenter, non-interventional, retrospective cohort study of disease-modifying therapies. European Neurology, 70(1-2):35-41.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is a scarcity of reports comparing efficacy and tolerability of the multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies [DMTs; intramuscular interferon-β1a (IM IFNβ-1a), subcutaneous (SC) IFNβ-1a, SC IFNβ-1b, SC glatiramer acetate (GA)] in a real-world setting.
METHODS: This multicenter, non-interventional, retrospective cohort study analyzed data from 546 patients with clinically isolated or relapsing-remitting MS constantly treated with one DMT for 2 years. Annualized relapse rate (ARR), Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores, and DMT tolerability were assessed.
RESULTS: Demographic data were comparable across DMTs. There were no significant differences between DMT groups in ARR during study year 1 (p = 0.277) or study year 2 (p = 0.670), or in EDSS change between years 1 and 2 (p = 0.624). Adverse events were frequent (39-56%) in all groups. Flu-like symptoms were less frequent with GA treatment (2.3% vs. IM IFNβ-1a, 46.7%; SC IFNβ-1a, 39.8%; SC IFNβ-1b, 25.8%; p < 0.05). Injection site reactions were less often reported with IM IFNβ-1a (10.5% vs. SC IFNβ-1a, 33.9%; SC IFNβ-1b, 38.3%; GA, 26.1%; p < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: All DMTs showed comparable effects on MS relapse rate and EDSS change, with IM IFNβ-1a and GA being more tolerable with respect to injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms, respectively.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is a scarcity of reports comparing efficacy and tolerability of the multiple sclerosis (MS) disease-modifying therapies [DMTs; intramuscular interferon-β1a (IM IFNβ-1a), subcutaneous (SC) IFNβ-1a, SC IFNβ-1b, SC glatiramer acetate (GA)] in a real-world setting.
METHODS: This multicenter, non-interventional, retrospective cohort study analyzed data from 546 patients with clinically isolated or relapsing-remitting MS constantly treated with one DMT for 2 years. Annualized relapse rate (ARR), Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) scores, and DMT tolerability were assessed.
RESULTS: Demographic data were comparable across DMTs. There were no significant differences between DMT groups in ARR during study year 1 (p = 0.277) or study year 2 (p = 0.670), or in EDSS change between years 1 and 2 (p = 0.624). Adverse events were frequent (39-56%) in all groups. Flu-like symptoms were less frequent with GA treatment (2.3% vs. IM IFNβ-1a, 46.7%; SC IFNβ-1a, 39.8%; SC IFNβ-1b, 25.8%; p < 0.05). Injection site reactions were less often reported with IM IFNβ-1a (10.5% vs. SC IFNβ-1a, 33.9%; SC IFNβ-1b, 38.3%; GA, 26.1%; p < 0.05).
CONCLUSIONS: All DMTs showed comparable effects on MS relapse rate and EDSS change, with IM IFNβ-1a and GA being more tolerable with respect to injection site reactions and flu-like symptoms, respectively.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Clinic for Neurology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:09 Dec 2013 16:21
Last Modified:09 Jun 2016 06:53
Publisher:Karger
ISSN:0014-3022
Additional Information:© 2013 S. Karger AG
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1159/000346761
PubMed ID:23689307

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