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Preoperative hematocrit concentration and the risk of stroke in patients undergoing isolated coronary-artery bypass grafting


Musallam, Khaled M; Jamali, Faek R; Rosendaal, Frits R; Richards, Toby; Spahn, Donat R; Khavandi, Kaivan; Barakat, Iskandar; Demoss, Benjamin; Lotta, Luca A; Peyvandi, Flora; Sfeir, Pier M (2013). Preoperative hematocrit concentration and the risk of stroke in patients undergoing isolated coronary-artery bypass grafting. Anemia, 2013:206829.

Abstract

Background. Identification and management of risk factors for stroke following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) could potentially lower the risk of such serious morbidity. Methods. We retrieved data for 30-day stroke incidence and perioperative variables for patients undergoing isolated CABG and used multivariate logistic regression to assess the adjusted effect of preoperative hematocrit concentration on stroke incidence. Results. In 2,313 patients (mean age 65.9 years, 73.6% men), 43 (1.9%, 95% CI: 1.4-2.5) developed stroke within 30 days following CABG (74.4% within 6 days). After adjustment for a priori defined potential confounders, each 1% drop in preoperative hematocrit concentration was associated with 1.07 (95% CI: 1.01-1.13) increased odds for stroke (men, OR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01-1.16; women, OR: 1.02, 95% CI: 0.91-1.16). The predicted probability of stroke for descending preoperative hematocrit concentration exceeded 2% for values <37% (<37% for men (adjusted OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.08-5.26) and <38% for women (adjusted OR: 2.52, 95% CI: 0.53-11.98), with a steeper probability increase noted in men). The association between lower preoperative hematocrit concentration and stroke was evident irrespective of intraoperative transfusion use. Conclusion. Screening and management of patients with low preoperative hematocrit concentration may alter postoperative stroke risk in patients undergoing isolated CABG.

Abstract

Background. Identification and management of risk factors for stroke following isolated coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) could potentially lower the risk of such serious morbidity. Methods. We retrieved data for 30-day stroke incidence and perioperative variables for patients undergoing isolated CABG and used multivariate logistic regression to assess the adjusted effect of preoperative hematocrit concentration on stroke incidence. Results. In 2,313 patients (mean age 65.9 years, 73.6% men), 43 (1.9%, 95% CI: 1.4-2.5) developed stroke within 30 days following CABG (74.4% within 6 days). After adjustment for a priori defined potential confounders, each 1% drop in preoperative hematocrit concentration was associated with 1.07 (95% CI: 1.01-1.13) increased odds for stroke (men, OR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01-1.16; women, OR: 1.02, 95% CI: 0.91-1.16). The predicted probability of stroke for descending preoperative hematocrit concentration exceeded 2% for values <37% (<37% for men (adjusted OR: 2.39, 95% CI: 1.08-5.26) and <38% for women (adjusted OR: 2.52, 95% CI: 0.53-11.98), with a steeper probability increase noted in men). The association between lower preoperative hematocrit concentration and stroke was evident irrespective of intraoperative transfusion use. Conclusion. Screening and management of patients with low preoperative hematocrit concentration may alter postoperative stroke risk in patients undergoing isolated CABG.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Institute of Anesthesiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:10 Dec 2013 08:33
Last Modified:14 Sep 2017 15:09
Publisher:Hindawi Publishing Corporation
ISSN:2090-1267
Free access at:PubMed ID. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/206829
PubMed ID:23738059

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