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Effect of acidic solution viscosity on enamel erosion


Aykut-Yetkiner, A; Wiegand, A; Bollhalder, A; Becker, K; Attin, T (2013). Effect of acidic solution viscosity on enamel erosion. Journal of Dental Research, 92(3):289-294.

Abstract

The objective of this in vitro study was to investigate the effects of viscosity changes of different acidic solutions on dental erosion. Bovine enamel samples (n = 240, Ø = 3 mm) were embedded in acrylic resin and were allocated to 30 groups (n = 8). Citric acid (CA) and phosphoric acid (PA) solutions at pH 2.5, 3, and 3.5 were prepared in de-ionized water (titratable acidity to pH 5.5: 31 ± 0.6 mmol OH(-)/l). The kinetic viscosities of the acidic solutions were adjusted to 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mm(2)/sec by the addition of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) at different concentrations. Solutions were pumped over the enamel surface from a reservoir with a drop rate of 1 mL/min. Each specimen was eroded for 10 min at 20 °C. Erosion of enamel surfaces was measured by profilometry. Data were analyzed by analyses of variance and logarithmic regression analyses (p < 0.05). Enamel loss was dependent on viscosity, pH, and the kind of acid. The regression analyses showed that higher viscosity caused lower enamel erosion for both acids and all pH levels. Dental erosion is dependent not only on chemical factors of the acid, like pH and acid type, but also on acid viscosity.

Abstract

The objective of this in vitro study was to investigate the effects of viscosity changes of different acidic solutions on dental erosion. Bovine enamel samples (n = 240, Ø = 3 mm) were embedded in acrylic resin and were allocated to 30 groups (n = 8). Citric acid (CA) and phosphoric acid (PA) solutions at pH 2.5, 3, and 3.5 were prepared in de-ionized water (titratable acidity to pH 5.5: 31 ± 0.6 mmol OH(-)/l). The kinetic viscosities of the acidic solutions were adjusted to 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 mm(2)/sec by the addition of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC) at different concentrations. Solutions were pumped over the enamel surface from a reservoir with a drop rate of 1 mL/min. Each specimen was eroded for 10 min at 20 °C. Erosion of enamel surfaces was measured by profilometry. Data were analyzed by analyses of variance and logarithmic regression analyses (p < 0.05). Enamel loss was dependent on viscosity, pH, and the kind of acid. The regression analyses showed that higher viscosity caused lower enamel erosion for both acids and all pH levels. Dental erosion is dependent not only on chemical factors of the acid, like pH and acid type, but also on acid viscosity.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:13 Dec 2013 14:05
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:14
Publisher:SAGE Publications
ISSN:0022-0345
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1177/0022034512473115
PubMed ID:23315475

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