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Radiographic accuracy in TKA with a CT-based patient-specific cutting block technique


Koch, P P; Müller, D; Pisan, M; Fucentese, S F (2013). Radiographic accuracy in TKA with a CT-based patient-specific cutting block technique. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 21(10):2200-2205.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) technology for the implantation of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has a rising interest in the orthopaedic community. Data of PSI are controversially discussed. The hypothesis of this paper is that the radiological accuracy of CT-based PSI is similar to the one of navigated TKA published in the literature.
METHODS: Since 2010, all 301 consecutively performed PSI TKAs (GMK MyKnee©) were included in this study. The radiological assessment consisted in a preoperative and postoperative standard X-ray and long-standing X-ray. Changes from the planned to the definitively implanted component size were documented. Postoperative analysis included limb alignment and position of femoral and tibial components (for varus/valgus and flexion or tibial slope).
RESULTS: The postoperative average hip-knee-ankle angle was 180.1° ± 2.0°. In the frontal plane a total of 12.4 % of outliers >3°, for the tibial components 4.1 % of outliers >3° and for the femoral components 4.8 % of outliers >3° were measured. A total of 12.3 % of outliers for posterior tibial slope and 9 % of outliers >3° for the femoral flexion were noted. 10.8 % of the 602 planned size components were adapted intraoperatively.
CONCLUSION: Although it is still unknown which limb axis is the correct one for the best clinical result, a technology providing the aimed axis in a most precise way should be chosen. Comparing the outcome of the current study with the data from the literature, there does not seem to be any difference compared to computer-assisted surgery.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.

Abstract

PURPOSE: Patient-specific instrumentation (PSI) technology for the implantation of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) has a rising interest in the orthopaedic community. Data of PSI are controversially discussed. The hypothesis of this paper is that the radiological accuracy of CT-based PSI is similar to the one of navigated TKA published in the literature.
METHODS: Since 2010, all 301 consecutively performed PSI TKAs (GMK MyKnee©) were included in this study. The radiological assessment consisted in a preoperative and postoperative standard X-ray and long-standing X-ray. Changes from the planned to the definitively implanted component size were documented. Postoperative analysis included limb alignment and position of femoral and tibial components (for varus/valgus and flexion or tibial slope).
RESULTS: The postoperative average hip-knee-ankle angle was 180.1° ± 2.0°. In the frontal plane a total of 12.4 % of outliers >3°, for the tibial components 4.1 % of outliers >3° and for the femoral components 4.8 % of outliers >3° were measured. A total of 12.3 % of outliers for posterior tibial slope and 9 % of outliers >3° for the femoral flexion were noted. 10.8 % of the 602 planned size components were adapted intraoperatively.
CONCLUSION: Although it is still unknown which limb axis is the correct one for the best clinical result, a technology providing the aimed axis in a most precise way should be chosen. Comparing the outcome of the current study with the data from the literature, there does not seem to be any difference compared to computer-assisted surgery.
LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: IV.

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26 citations in Web of Science®
33 citations in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Balgrist University Hospital, Swiss Spinal Cord Injury Center
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:16 Dec 2013 13:45
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:16
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0942-2056
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00167-013-2625-6
PubMed ID:23942882

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