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Using laboratory experiments to study law and crime


Horne, Christine; Rauhut, Heiko (2013). Using laboratory experiments to study law and crime. Quality and Quantity, 47(3):1639-1655.

Abstract

The 19th and 20th centuries produced breakthroughs in physics, chemistry, and the biological sciences. Laboratory research played an important role in the rapid advances made in these fields. Laboratory research can also contribute progress in the social sciences and, in particular, to law and criminology. To make this argument, we begin by discussing what laboratory experiments can and cannot do. We then provide three illustrations of lab experiments that have contributed to understanding of crime and law and discuss how these laboratory data complement those gained through other methods.

Abstract

The 19th and 20th centuries produced breakthroughs in physics, chemistry, and the biological sciences. Laboratory research played an important role in the rapid advances made in these fields. Laboratory research can also contribute progress in the social sciences and, in particular, to law and criminology. To make this argument, we begin by discussing what laboratory experiments can and cannot do. We then provide three illustrations of lab experiments that have contributed to understanding of crime and law and discuss how these laboratory data complement those gained through other methods.

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1 citation in Scopus®
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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Sociology
Dewey Decimal Classification:300 Social sciences, sociology & anthropology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Laboratory experiments, Experimental methods, Law, Crime
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:23 Dec 2013 11:45
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:16
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0033-5177
Funders:ETH Zurich
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s11135-011-9617-8

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