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Effects of shoeing on limb movement and ground reaction forces in Icelandic horses at walk, tölt and trot


Waldern, Nina M; Wiestner, Thomas; Ramseier, Lea C; Amport, Claude; Weishaupt, M A (2013). Effects of shoeing on limb movement and ground reaction forces in Icelandic horses at walk, tölt and trot. Veterinary Journal, 198(Suppl. 1):e103-e108.

Abstract

Tölt is a symmetric four-beat gait with a speed range extending into that of trot and canter. Specific shoeing methods, such as unnaturally high and long hooves, are used to enforce individual gait predisposition. The aim of this study was to assess the consequences of this shoeing style on loading and movement of the limbs at walk, tölt and trot, and at different velocities. Simultaneous kinetic and kinematic gait analysis was carried out at walk (1.4 m/s) and at two tölting and trotting speeds (3.3 m/s and 3.9 m/s) on an instrumented treadmill. Thirteen sound Icelandic horses were first measured with high, long front hooves (SH) and, one week later, after trimming the hooves according to standard shoeing principles (SN). Comparing SH with SN, front hooves had 21 ± 5 mm longer dorsal hoof walls and the shoeing material per hoof was 273 ± 50 g heavier. In all three gaits, gait quality, as it is currently judged, was improved with SH due to a lower stride rate, a longer stride length and a higher, but not wider, forelimb protraction arc, which were also positively associated with speed. Forelimb-hind limb balance remained unchanged, but limb impulses were higher. Apart from an increase of ⩽ 2.2% in the forelimbs at the faster speed of both tölt and trot, SH had little influence on vertical peak forces.

Abstract

Tölt is a symmetric four-beat gait with a speed range extending into that of trot and canter. Specific shoeing methods, such as unnaturally high and long hooves, are used to enforce individual gait predisposition. The aim of this study was to assess the consequences of this shoeing style on loading and movement of the limbs at walk, tölt and trot, and at different velocities. Simultaneous kinetic and kinematic gait analysis was carried out at walk (1.4 m/s) and at two tölting and trotting speeds (3.3 m/s and 3.9 m/s) on an instrumented treadmill. Thirteen sound Icelandic horses were first measured with high, long front hooves (SH) and, one week later, after trimming the hooves according to standard shoeing principles (SN). Comparing SH with SN, front hooves had 21 ± 5 mm longer dorsal hoof walls and the shoeing material per hoof was 273 ± 50 g heavier. In all three gaits, gait quality, as it is currently judged, was improved with SH due to a lower stride rate, a longer stride length and a higher, but not wider, forelimb protraction arc, which were also positively associated with speed. Forelimb-hind limb balance remained unchanged, but limb impulses were higher. Apart from an increase of ⩽ 2.2% in the forelimbs at the faster speed of both tölt and trot, SH had little influence on vertical peak forces.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Veterinary Clinic > Equine Department
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
630 Agriculture
Uncontrolled Keywords:Icelandic horse; Gait analysis; Ground reaction force; Kinematics; Shoeing; Tölt
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:17 Dec 2013 12:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:16
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1090-0233
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tvjl.2013.09.042

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