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A participatory method for agrobiodiversity conservation


Rohrbach, Beni; Laube, Patrick (2013). A participatory method for agrobiodiversity conservation. In: 5th Symposium for Research in Protected Areas, Mittersill (A), 10 June 2013 - 12 June 2013, 669-670.

Abstract

Which sites would be best to revive cultivating crops and vegetables? In Swiss mountains, the area used for arable farming decreased by over 50% from 1990 to 2010. We are interested in methods able to integrate different knowledge forms and viewpoints with spatial reference. Arable farming contributes to culture, local knowledge, and landscape aesthetics. At the same time it is dependent on those elements. Therefore, biosphere reserves are candidates for reviving arable farming. Here, an approach called participatory mapping is used to find the suitable sites. Airborne photos serve as a basis with a direct reference to the physical world. Various stakeholders then create a thematic map by drawing suitable areas on top of the photos. While participatory mapping was applied on a broad range of topics, this method lacks scientifically sound guidelines for best application. Hence, we research required sample size and the influence of mapping scales and technologies. In addition, we examine precision, accuracy, and validity of the data gathered through participatory mapping. We further look into additional effects such as social learning or emerging conflicts as a consequence of the mapping process. In this project, arable farming in the protected areas serves as a case study. However, the method has much broader application possibilities.

Abstract

Which sites would be best to revive cultivating crops and vegetables? In Swiss mountains, the area used for arable farming decreased by over 50% from 1990 to 2010. We are interested in methods able to integrate different knowledge forms and viewpoints with spatial reference. Arable farming contributes to culture, local knowledge, and landscape aesthetics. At the same time it is dependent on those elements. Therefore, biosphere reserves are candidates for reviving arable farming. Here, an approach called participatory mapping is used to find the suitable sites. Airborne photos serve as a basis with a direct reference to the physical world. Various stakeholders then create a thematic map by drawing suitable areas on top of the photos. While participatory mapping was applied on a broad range of topics, this method lacks scientifically sound guidelines for best application. Hence, we research required sample size and the influence of mapping scales and technologies. In addition, we examine precision, accuracy, and validity of the data gathered through participatory mapping. We further look into additional effects such as social learning or emerging conflicts as a consequence of the mapping process. In this project, arable farming in the protected areas serves as a case study. However, the method has much broader application possibilities.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Event End Date:12 June 2013
Deposited On:03 Jan 2014 13:49
Last Modified:06 Apr 2017 15:23
Publisher:Hohe Tauern National Park
Official URL:http://www.landesmuseum.at/pdf_frei_remote/NP_Hohe_Tauern_Conference_5_0669-0670.pdf

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