Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Wood anatomical analysis of Swiss willow (Salix helvetica) shrubs growing on creeping mountain permafrost


Gärtner-Roer, Isabelle; Heinrich, Ingo; Gärtner, Holger (2013). Wood anatomical analysis of Swiss willow (Salix helvetica) shrubs growing on creeping mountain permafrost. Dendrochronologia, 31(2):97-104.

Abstract

Permafrost and related landforms (rockglaciers) are widespread phenomena in alpine geosystems. In the context of changing environments due to the significant warming, there is a need for thorough monitoring and analyzing the complex responses of these cryospheric geosystems. Here, the first-time application of wood anatomical methods in this context is presented in order to investigate whether rockglacier movement is reflected in varying cell structures of plants growing on top of the rockglaciers.
In order to determine the influence of ground movements (by permafrost creep) and their influence on the conductive elements within roots of plants, wood-samples were taken from active and inactive rockglaciers in the Turtmann Valley, southern Swiss Alps. Since the occurrence of trees is limited altitudinally, the investigation was restricted to Swiss willow shrubs (Salix helvetica) frequently growing in permafrost areas above the timberline in the European Alps. This rather new approach concentrates on general vessel size differences as a result of mechanical stresses. The comparison of vessel sizes in roots of Swiss willow shrubs growing on active and inactive permafrost bodies depicts differences within the roots, which are related to the activity status of the respective rockglacier creep.

Abstract

Permafrost and related landforms (rockglaciers) are widespread phenomena in alpine geosystems. In the context of changing environments due to the significant warming, there is a need for thorough monitoring and analyzing the complex responses of these cryospheric geosystems. Here, the first-time application of wood anatomical methods in this context is presented in order to investigate whether rockglacier movement is reflected in varying cell structures of plants growing on top of the rockglaciers.
In order to determine the influence of ground movements (by permafrost creep) and their influence on the conductive elements within roots of plants, wood-samples were taken from active and inactive rockglaciers in the Turtmann Valley, southern Swiss Alps. Since the occurrence of trees is limited altitudinally, the investigation was restricted to Swiss willow shrubs (Salix helvetica) frequently growing in permafrost areas above the timberline in the European Alps. This rather new approach concentrates on general vessel size differences as a result of mechanical stresses. The comparison of vessel sizes in roots of Swiss willow shrubs growing on active and inactive permafrost bodies depicts differences within the roots, which are related to the activity status of the respective rockglacier creep.

Statistics

Citations

7 citations in Web of Science®
7 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

1 download since deposited on 05 Jan 2014
0 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:05 Jan 2014 11:56
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:18
Publisher:Urban und Fischer Verlag
ISSN:1125-7865
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dendro.2012.09.003

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Language: English
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 3MB
View at publisher

Article Networks

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations