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Chlamydiaceae and chlamydia-like organisms in free-living small mammals in Europe and Afghanistan


Stephan, S; Guerra, D; Pospischil, A; Hilbe, M; Weissenböck, H; Novotny, L; Greub, G; Croxatto, A; Teifke, J P; Ulrich, R G; Schlegel, M; Ruhl, S; Schotte, U; Binder, A; Sauer, S; Borel, N (2014). Chlamydiaceae and chlamydia-like organisms in free-living small mammals in Europe and Afghanistan. Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 50(2):195-204.

Abstract

Few data are available on the occurrence of chlamydial infections in wild small mammals. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the significance of free-living small mammals as reservoirs or transmission hosts for chlamydiae. In total, 3,664 tissue samples originating from 911 animals were collected in Switzerland, Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic and Afghanistan. Samples included internal organs (n = 3,652) and feces (n = 12) from 679 rodents (order Rodentia) and 232 insectivores (order Eulipotyphla) and were tested by three different TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reactions (PCR) specific for members of the family Chlamydiaceae and selected Chlamydia-like organisms such as Parachlamydia spp. and Waddlia spp. Only one out of 911 (0.11%) animals exhibited a questionable positive result by Chlamydiaceae specific real-time PCR. Furthermore, five out of 911 animals (0.55%) were positive by specific real-time PCR for Parachlamydia spp. but could not be confirmed by Parachlamydia acanthamoebae secY qPCR. One out of 746 animals (0.13%) showed a positive result by real-time PCR for Waddlia chondrophila. This result was confirmed by Waddlia secY qPCR. This study represents the first detection of Chlamydia-like organisms in small wildlife in Switzerland. Considering previous negative results for Chlamydiaceae in wild ruminant species from Switzerland, these data suggest that wild small mammals are unlikely to be important carriers or transport hosts for Chamydiaceae and Chlamydia-like organisms.

Abstract

Few data are available on the occurrence of chlamydial infections in wild small mammals. Therefore, the present study aimed to investigate the significance of free-living small mammals as reservoirs or transmission hosts for chlamydiae. In total, 3,664 tissue samples originating from 911 animals were collected in Switzerland, Germany, Austria, the Czech Republic and Afghanistan. Samples included internal organs (n = 3,652) and feces (n = 12) from 679 rodents (order Rodentia) and 232 insectivores (order Eulipotyphla) and were tested by three different TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reactions (PCR) specific for members of the family Chlamydiaceae and selected Chlamydia-like organisms such as Parachlamydia spp. and Waddlia spp. Only one out of 911 (0.11%) animals exhibited a questionable positive result by Chlamydiaceae specific real-time PCR. Furthermore, five out of 911 animals (0.55%) were positive by specific real-time PCR for Parachlamydia spp. but could not be confirmed by Parachlamydia acanthamoebae secY qPCR. One out of 746 animals (0.13%) showed a positive result by real-time PCR for Waddlia chondrophila. This result was confirmed by Waddlia secY qPCR. This study represents the first detection of Chlamydia-like organisms in small wildlife in Switzerland. Considering previous negative results for Chlamydiaceae in wild ruminant species from Switzerland, these data suggest that wild small mammals are unlikely to be important carriers or transport hosts for Chamydiaceae and Chlamydia-like organisms.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Uncontrolled Keywords:Chlamydiaceae, Parachlamydia, Real-time PCR, Waddlia, wildlife
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:06 Jan 2014 09:54
Last Modified:23 Nov 2017 09:08
Publisher:Wildlife Disease Association
ISSN:0090-3558
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.7589/2013-08-194
Related URLs:http://www.jwildlifedis.org/

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