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Treating skin and lung fibrosis in systemic sclerosis: a future filled with promise?


Antic, Milos; Distler, Jörg H W; Distler, Oliver (2013). Treating skin and lung fibrosis in systemic sclerosis: a future filled with promise? Current Opinion in Pharmacology, 13(3):455-462.

Abstract

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by immune activation, vascular damage and an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the skin and internal organs. Despite its high morbidity and increased mortality, currently available treatment options for fibrotic manifestations of SSc remain limited and their clinical antifibrotic effects are borderline. In this review, novel insights from recently published clinical trials in SSc on treatment concepts such as mycophenolate mofetil, oral type I collagen, recombinant human relaxin and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are discussed. In the past decade the most significant progress in this field has been made by the identification of a large number of cellular and molecular key players in the pathogenesis of fibrotic disease manifestations. This has led to the identification of novel candidates as molecular targets for treatment of fibrotic diseases. On the basis of their level of evidence from preclinical studies and based on the availability of first clinical results, the most promising targets are presented including inhibitors of B-cells, tyrosine kinases, 5-hydroxytryptamin receptors, interleukin-6 and Wnt signalling.

Abstract

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a rare autoimmune disorder characterized by immune activation, vascular damage and an excessive accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in the skin and internal organs. Despite its high morbidity and increased mortality, currently available treatment options for fibrotic manifestations of SSc remain limited and their clinical antifibrotic effects are borderline. In this review, novel insights from recently published clinical trials in SSc on treatment concepts such as mycophenolate mofetil, oral type I collagen, recombinant human relaxin and autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are discussed. In the past decade the most significant progress in this field has been made by the identification of a large number of cellular and molecular key players in the pathogenesis of fibrotic disease manifestations. This has led to the identification of novel candidates as molecular targets for treatment of fibrotic diseases. On the basis of their level of evidence from preclinical studies and based on the availability of first clinical results, the most promising targets are presented including inhibitors of B-cells, tyrosine kinases, 5-hydroxytryptamin receptors, interleukin-6 and Wnt signalling.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, further contribution
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Rheumatology Clinic and Institute of Physical Medicine
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Date:2013
Deposited On:06 Jan 2014 12:37
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:19
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:1471-4892
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.coph.2013.05.016
PubMed ID:23747024

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