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Unterschiedliche Abheilungsdauer und Häufigkeit der Hospitalisation bei Ulcus cruris verschiedener Ursachen


Läuchli, S; Bayard, I; Hafner, J; Hunziker, T; Mayer, D; French, L (2013). Unterschiedliche Abheilungsdauer und Häufigkeit der Hospitalisation bei Ulcus cruris verschiedener Ursachen. Der Hautarzt, 64(12):917-922.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Leg ulcers are a symptom of a heterogeneous group of diseases. Their treatment causes substantial costs due to the long healing times and extensive wound care measures. There is a paucity of information about healing times and the necessity of hospital treatment for leg ulcers of different etiologies.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, healing times and the frequency of in-hospital treatment of 355 patients with leg ulcers attending a wound care clinic of a university hospital were examined.
RESULTS: The proportion of healed ulcers was 32.0 % after 3 months and 54.3 % after 6 months with an average treatment duration of 6.1 months for all ulcers. This proportion of healed ulcers was higher for venous ulcers with 45.5 % after 3 months and 63.0 % after 6 months, whereas only 30.0 % of mixed arterial-venous ulcers and 35.0 % of hypertensive ischemic leg ulcers (HYTILU) were healed after 6 months. Of the latter group, 71 % of patients were hospitalized at least once during the observation period as compared to 47 % of patients with a venous ulcer. The duration of the hospital stay was longer for mixed ulcers and HYTILU with an average of 30 days vs. 23 days for venous ulcers.
CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that the healing times of ulcers of different etiologies differ substantially and that especially ulcers with arteriosclerosis as a causative factor have longer healing times. The fact that they require in-hospital treatment more frequently and for longer periods has significant socio-economic consequences.

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Leg ulcers are a symptom of a heterogeneous group of diseases. Their treatment causes substantial costs due to the long healing times and extensive wound care measures. There is a paucity of information about healing times and the necessity of hospital treatment for leg ulcers of different etiologies.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this retrospective study, healing times and the frequency of in-hospital treatment of 355 patients with leg ulcers attending a wound care clinic of a university hospital were examined.
RESULTS: The proportion of healed ulcers was 32.0 % after 3 months and 54.3 % after 6 months with an average treatment duration of 6.1 months for all ulcers. This proportion of healed ulcers was higher for venous ulcers with 45.5 % after 3 months and 63.0 % after 6 months, whereas only 30.0 % of mixed arterial-venous ulcers and 35.0 % of hypertensive ischemic leg ulcers (HYTILU) were healed after 6 months. Of the latter group, 71 % of patients were hospitalized at least once during the observation period as compared to 47 % of patients with a venous ulcer. The duration of the hospital stay was longer for mixed ulcers and HYTILU with an average of 30 days vs. 23 days for venous ulcers.
CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that the healing times of ulcers of different etiologies differ substantially and that especially ulcers with arteriosclerosis as a causative factor have longer healing times. The fact that they require in-hospital treatment more frequently and for longer periods has significant socio-economic consequences.

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Additional indexing

Other titles:Healing times and the need for hospitalization for leg ulcers of different etiologies
Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > University Hospital Zurich > Dermatology Clinic
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:08 Jan 2014 07:43
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:20
Publisher:Springer
ISSN:0017-8470
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/s00105-013-2671-5
PubMed ID:24077917

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