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Understanding soil acidification process using animation and text: an empirical user evaluation with eye tracking


Russo, Patrizia; Pettit, Christopher; Coltekin, Arzu; Imhof, Mark; Cox, Matt; Bayliss, Christopher (2014). Understanding soil acidification process using animation and text: an empirical user evaluation with eye tracking. In: Buchroithner, Manfred; Prechtel, Nikolas; Burghardt, Dirk. Cartography from Pole to Pole. Selected Contributions to the XXVIth International Conference of the ICA, Dresden 2013. Berlin: Springer (Bücher), 431-448.

Abstract

This chapter presents a user study in which the participant performance is comparatively measured using two ways of presenting information: animation and text. The stimuli contain equivalent information, but use fundamentally different ways of communicating this information. We designed a workplace to simulate the process as it may occur in the real world. First, a representative task from an actual website was selected (i.e., understanding the soil acidification process). 50 participants first took part in a short ‘study session’, where they were told to remember as much as possible. Then they took a multiple choice test using either the animation or the text in an ‘‘open book’’ setting. The tested media have been assessed through the classical measures of effectiveness (error rate), and efficiency (time to complete the multiple choice test). Text users achieved a slightly higher score in the multiple choice test and required less time compared to animation users. In contrast, more of the animation users considered the questions ‘‘easy’’. Thus, against all intuition (yet in agreement with some of the previous findings in literature) animation does not appear to perform better for the tasks in this experiment. To further strengthen the experiment, an eye tracking study was also conducted with the animated displays for a more in-depth effort to explore user strategies when asked to ‘remember as much as possible’.

Abstract

This chapter presents a user study in which the participant performance is comparatively measured using two ways of presenting information: animation and text. The stimuli contain equivalent information, but use fundamentally different ways of communicating this information. We designed a workplace to simulate the process as it may occur in the real world. First, a representative task from an actual website was selected (i.e., understanding the soil acidification process). 50 participants first took part in a short ‘study session’, where they were told to remember as much as possible. Then they took a multiple choice test using either the animation or the text in an ‘‘open book’’ setting. The tested media have been assessed through the classical measures of effectiveness (error rate), and efficiency (time to complete the multiple choice test). Text users achieved a slightly higher score in the multiple choice test and required less time compared to animation users. In contrast, more of the animation users considered the questions ‘‘easy’’. Thus, against all intuition (yet in agreement with some of the previous findings in literature) animation does not appear to perform better for the tasks in this experiment. To further strengthen the experiment, an eye tracking study was also conducted with the animated displays for a more in-depth effort to explore user strategies when asked to ‘remember as much as possible’.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Book Section, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:07 Faculty of Science > Institute of Geography
Dewey Decimal Classification:910 Geography & travel
Language:English
Date:2014
Deposited On:17 Jan 2014 08:27
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:20
Publisher:Springer (Bücher)
ISSN:1863-2246
ISBN:978-3-642-32617-2
Additional Information:Series: Lecture Notes in Geoinformation and Cartography Subseries: Publications of the International Cartographic Association (ICA)
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-32618-9_31

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