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ADSEAT - Adaptive seat to reduce neck injuries for female and male occupants


Linder, Astrid; Schick, Sylvia; Hell, Wolfram; Svensson, Mats; Carlsson, Anna; Lemmen, Paul; Schmitt, Kai-Uwe; Gutsche, Andreas; Tomasch, Ernst (2013). ADSEAT - Adaptive seat to reduce neck injuries for female and male occupants. Accident Analysis & Prevention , 60:334-343.

Abstract

Neck injuries sustained in low severity vehicle crashes are of worldwide concern and the risk is higher for females than for males. The objective of the study was to provide guidance on how to evaluate protective performance of vehicle seat designs aiming to reduce the incidence of neck injuries for female and male occupants. The objective was achieved by reviewing injury risk, establishing anthropometric data of an average female, performing dynamic volunteer tests comprising females and males, and developing a finite element model, EvaRID, of an average female. With respect to injury criteria, it was concluded based on the tests that using NIC (with a lower threshold value) and Nkm (with reduced intercept values) for females would be a suitable starting point. Virtual impact simulations with seats showed that differences were found in the response of the BioRID II and EvaRID models, for certain seats.

Abstract

Neck injuries sustained in low severity vehicle crashes are of worldwide concern and the risk is higher for females than for males. The objective of the study was to provide guidance on how to evaluate protective performance of vehicle seat designs aiming to reduce the incidence of neck injuries for female and male occupants. The objective was achieved by reviewing injury risk, establishing anthropometric data of an average female, performing dynamic volunteer tests comprising females and males, and developing a finite element model, EvaRID, of an average female. With respect to injury criteria, it was concluded based on the tests that using NIC (with a lower threshold value) and Nkm (with reduced intercept values) for females would be a suitable starting point. Virtual impact simulations with seats showed that differences were found in the response of the BioRID II and EvaRID models, for certain seats.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Biomedical Engineering
Dewey Decimal Classification:170 Ethics
610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:10 Jan 2014 11:40
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:21
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0001-4575
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aap.2013.02.043
PubMed ID:23602605

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