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Sodium hypochlorite with reduced surface tension does not improve in situ pulp tissue dissolution


De-Deus, Gustavo; de Berredo Pinho, Marco André; Reis, Claudia; Fidel, Sandra; Souza, Erick; Zehnder, Matthias (2013). Sodium hypochlorite with reduced surface tension does not improve in situ pulp tissue dissolution. Journal of Endodontics, 39(8):1039-1043.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:
Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solutions with added wetting agents are advertised to dissolve necrotic tissue in root canals faster than their counterparts without a lowered surface tension. This was tested in the current study, and the null hypothesis formulated was that there was no difference between a commercially available NaOCl solution with a lowered surface tension (Chlor-XTRA; Vista Dental Products, Racine, WI) and a counterpart containing the same amount of available chlorine without added wetting agents regarding the soft tissue that remains in oval-shaped canals after mechanical preparation and irrigation.
METHODS:
Formerly vital extracted teeth (N = 44, 22 pairs) with similar anatomy were radiographically paired and chemomechanically prepared. In 1 tooth from each pair, a 5.25% NaOCl solution with reduced surface tension was used; in the other, a pure, technical-grade NaOCl solution of 5.25% was used. The percentage of remaining pulp tissue (PRPT) was histologically assessed in root cross-sections. The non-Gaussian raw data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests to verify the respective effect of the cross-section level and solution on the PRPT. The relationship between the cross-section level and the PRPT was estimated by the Spearman correlation test. The alpha-type error was set at 5%.
RESULTS:
The cross-section level significantly influenced the PRPT (P < .05), whereas the PRPT was not influenced by the solution used (P > .05). A significant inverse correlation was found between the cross-section level and the PRPT (P < .05, r = -0.330). The lower the distance to the apex, the higher the PRPT regardless of the solution used.
CONCLUSIONS:
Contrary to the advertised statement, the dental solution with a reduced surface tension did not dissolve vital pulp tissue in oval root canals any better than a conventional NaOCl solution of similar strength. Closer to the apex, pulp tissue dissolution is less efficient irrespective of the solution.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION:
Sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) solutions with added wetting agents are advertised to dissolve necrotic tissue in root canals faster than their counterparts without a lowered surface tension. This was tested in the current study, and the null hypothesis formulated was that there was no difference between a commercially available NaOCl solution with a lowered surface tension (Chlor-XTRA; Vista Dental Products, Racine, WI) and a counterpart containing the same amount of available chlorine without added wetting agents regarding the soft tissue that remains in oval-shaped canals after mechanical preparation and irrigation.
METHODS:
Formerly vital extracted teeth (N = 44, 22 pairs) with similar anatomy were radiographically paired and chemomechanically prepared. In 1 tooth from each pair, a 5.25% NaOCl solution with reduced surface tension was used; in the other, a pure, technical-grade NaOCl solution of 5.25% was used. The percentage of remaining pulp tissue (PRPT) was histologically assessed in root cross-sections. The non-Gaussian raw data were subjected to Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests to verify the respective effect of the cross-section level and solution on the PRPT. The relationship between the cross-section level and the PRPT was estimated by the Spearman correlation test. The alpha-type error was set at 5%.
RESULTS:
The cross-section level significantly influenced the PRPT (P < .05), whereas the PRPT was not influenced by the solution used (P > .05). A significant inverse correlation was found between the cross-section level and the PRPT (P < .05, r = -0.330). The lower the distance to the apex, the higher the PRPT regardless of the solution used.
CONCLUSIONS:
Contrary to the advertised statement, the dental solution with a reduced surface tension did not dissolve vital pulp tissue in oval root canals any better than a conventional NaOCl solution of similar strength. Closer to the apex, pulp tissue dissolution is less efficient irrespective of the solution.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Dental Medicine > Clinic for Preventive Dentistry, Periodontology and Cariology
Dewey Decimal Classification:610 Medicine & health
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:13 Jan 2014 13:03
Last Modified:16 Feb 2018 18:52
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0099-2399
OA Status:Green
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.joen.2013.04.035
PubMed ID:23880273

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