Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Metropolitan Geography, Electoral Participation, and Partisan Competition


Sellers, Jefferey M; Kübler, Daniel; Walks, R Alan; Walter-Rogg, Melanie; Rochat, Philippe (2013). Metropolitan Geography, Electoral Participation, and Partisan Competition. In: American Political Science Association. Annual Meeting, Chicago, 29 August 2013 - 1 September 2013.

Abstract

Throughout the developed world and beyond, diversified metropolitan regions have replaced the centuries-old divide between city and countryside. In the varied polities of contemporary democracies, the common geographies of metropolitan regions have given rise to parallel territorial patterns of electoral participation and partisan orientations. This paper, drawing on a pooled eleven-country ecological dataset, presents results from the first systematic international comparative analysis of these patterns. We find that the contextual effects from metropolitan places on voting go beyond what the social and economic composition of those places can explain. Parties from across the partisan spectrum now look to strongholds in particular types of metropolitan settings, and compete for dominance in others. In metropolitanized democracies, stronger electoral mobilization among low-density, affluent and middle class suburbs has skewed electoral competition. Metropolitan geographies thus embed electoral advantages for parties on the Right, and for parties that embrace neoliberal policy agendas.

Abstract

Throughout the developed world and beyond, diversified metropolitan regions have replaced the centuries-old divide between city and countryside. In the varied polities of contemporary democracies, the common geographies of metropolitan regions have given rise to parallel territorial patterns of electoral participation and partisan orientations. This paper, drawing on a pooled eleven-country ecological dataset, presents results from the first systematic international comparative analysis of these patterns. We find that the contextual effects from metropolitan places on voting go beyond what the social and economic composition of those places can explain. Parties from across the partisan spectrum now look to strongholds in particular types of metropolitan settings, and compete for dominance in others. In metropolitanized democracies, stronger electoral mobilization among low-density, affluent and middle class suburbs has skewed electoral competition. Metropolitan geographies thus embed electoral advantages for parties on the Right, and for parties that embrace neoliberal policy agendas.

Statistics

Downloads

85 downloads since deposited on 09 Jan 2014
11 downloads since 12 months
Detailed statistics

Additional indexing

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper), not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Political Science
Dewey Decimal Classification:320 Political science
Language:English
Event End Date:1 September 2013
Deposited On:09 Jan 2014 09:24
Last Modified:08 Dec 2017 01:51
Publisher:ECPR Press/Columbia University Press
Additional Information:Full acknowledgements, methodological appendices and an extended version of this analysis may be found in Jefferey M. Sellers, Daniel Kübler, Alan Walks and Melanie Walter-Rogg (eds.), The Political Ecology of the Metropolis (Essex: ECPR Press/Columbia University Press, 2013).

Download

Download PDF  'Metropolitan Geography, Electoral Participation, and Partisan Competition'.
Preview
Language: English
Filetype: PDF
Size: 1MB