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Intraperitoneal administration of high doses of polyethylene glycol (PEG) causes hepatic subcapsular necrosis and low-grade peritonitis with a rise in hepatic biomarkers


Pellegrini, G; Starkey Lewis, P J; Palmer, L; Hetzel, U; Goldring, C E; Park, B K; Kipar, A; Williams, D P (2013). Intraperitoneal administration of high doses of polyethylene glycol (PEG) causes hepatic subcapsular necrosis and low-grade peritonitis with a rise in hepatic biomarkers. Toxicology, 314(2-3):262-266.

Abstract

Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are commonly employed as excipients in preclinical studies and in vitro experiments to dissolve poorly hydrosoluble drugs. Their use is generally considered safe in both animals and humans; however, limited data is available concerning the safety of PEGs when administered parenterally. The results of our investigation demonstrate that PEG-400 can have an irritant effect on serosal surfaces and causes subcapsular hepatocellular necrosis in mice when administered intraperitoneally at a high dose (4mL/kg). Accordingly, levels of serum biomarkers of liver injury need to be carefully interpreted in studies where PEG is administered intraperitoneally and always in association with the results of the histological assessment.

Abstract

Polyethylene glycols (PEGs) are commonly employed as excipients in preclinical studies and in vitro experiments to dissolve poorly hydrosoluble drugs. Their use is generally considered safe in both animals and humans; however, limited data is available concerning the safety of PEGs when administered parenterally. The results of our investigation demonstrate that PEG-400 can have an irritant effect on serosal surfaces and causes subcapsular hepatocellular necrosis in mice when administered intraperitoneally at a high dose (4mL/kg). Accordingly, levels of serum biomarkers of liver injury need to be carefully interpreted in studies where PEG is administered intraperitoneally and always in association with the results of the histological assessment.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:05 Vetsuisse Faculty > Institute of Veterinary Pathology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
Language:English
Date:2013
Deposited On:15 Jan 2014 09:47
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:21
Publisher:Elsevier
ISSN:0300-483X
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tox.2013.06.003
PubMed ID:23831209

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