Header

UZH-Logo

Maintenance Infos

Protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor-1 deficiency reduces phosphorylation of renal NaCl cotransporter and causes arterial hypotension


Picard, Nicolas; Trompf, Katja; Yang, Chao-Ling; Miller, R Lance; Carrel, Monique; Loffing-Cueni, Dominique; Fenton, Robert A; Ellison, David H; Loffing, Johannes (2014). Protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor-1 deficiency reduces phosphorylation of renal NaCl cotransporter and causes arterial hypotension. Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN), 25(3):511-522.

Abstract

The thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) of the renal distal convoluted tubule (DCT) controls ion homeostasis and arterial BP. Loss-of-function mutations of NCC cause renal salt wasting with arterial hypotension (Gitelman syndrome). Conversely, mutations in the NCC-regulating WNK kinases or kelch-like 3 protein cause familial hyperkalemic hypertension. Here, we performed automated sorting of mouse DCTs and microarray analysis for comprehensive identification of novel DCT-enriched gene products, which may potentially regulate DCT and NCC function. This approach identified protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor-1 (I-1) as a DCT-enriched transcript, and immunohistochemistry revealed I-1 expression in mouse and human DCTs and thick ascending limbs. In heterologous expression systems, coexpression of NCC with I-1 increased thiazide-dependent Na(+) uptake, whereas RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous I-1 reduced NCC phosphorylation. Likewise, levels of phosphorylated NCC decreased by approximately 50% in I-1 (I-1(-/-)) knockout mice without changes in total NCC expression. The abundance and phosphorylation of other renal sodium-transporting proteins, including NaPi-IIa, NKCC2, and ENaC, did not change, although the abundance of pendrin increased in these mice. The abundance, phosphorylation, and subcellular localization of SPAK were similar in wild-type (WT) and I-1(-/-) mice. Compared with WT mice, I-1(-/-) mice exhibited significantly lower arterial BP but did not display other metabolic features of NCC dysregulation. Thus, I-1 is a DCT-enriched gene product that controls arterial BP, possibly through regulation of NCC activity.

Abstract

The thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC) of the renal distal convoluted tubule (DCT) controls ion homeostasis and arterial BP. Loss-of-function mutations of NCC cause renal salt wasting with arterial hypotension (Gitelman syndrome). Conversely, mutations in the NCC-regulating WNK kinases or kelch-like 3 protein cause familial hyperkalemic hypertension. Here, we performed automated sorting of mouse DCTs and microarray analysis for comprehensive identification of novel DCT-enriched gene products, which may potentially regulate DCT and NCC function. This approach identified protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor-1 (I-1) as a DCT-enriched transcript, and immunohistochemistry revealed I-1 expression in mouse and human DCTs and thick ascending limbs. In heterologous expression systems, coexpression of NCC with I-1 increased thiazide-dependent Na(+) uptake, whereas RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous I-1 reduced NCC phosphorylation. Likewise, levels of phosphorylated NCC decreased by approximately 50% in I-1 (I-1(-/-)) knockout mice without changes in total NCC expression. The abundance and phosphorylation of other renal sodium-transporting proteins, including NaPi-IIa, NKCC2, and ENaC, did not change, although the abundance of pendrin increased in these mice. The abundance, phosphorylation, and subcellular localization of SPAK were similar in wild-type (WT) and I-1(-/-) mice. Compared with WT mice, I-1(-/-) mice exhibited significantly lower arterial BP but did not display other metabolic features of NCC dysregulation. Thus, I-1 is a DCT-enriched gene product that controls arterial BP, possibly through regulation of NCC activity.

Statistics

Citations

19 citations in Web of Science®
20 citations in Scopus®
Google Scholar™

Altmetrics

Downloads

0 downloads since deposited on 15 Jan 2014
0 downloads since 12 months

Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:04 Faculty of Medicine > Institute of Anatomy
04 Faculty of Medicine > Center for Integrative Human Physiology
Dewey Decimal Classification:570 Life sciences; biology
610 Medicine & health
Date:2014
Deposited On:15 Jan 2014 12:24
Last Modified:05 Apr 2016 17:22
Publisher:American Society of Nephrology
ISSN:1046-6673
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Publisher DOI:https://doi.org/10.1681/ASN.2012121202
PubMed ID:24231659

Download

Preview Icon on Download
Content: Published Version
Filetype: PDF - Registered users only
Size: 3MB
View at publisher

TrendTerms

TrendTerms displays relevant terms of the abstract of this publication and related documents on a map. The terms and their relations were extracted from ZORA using word statistics. Their timelines are taken from ZORA as well. The bubble size of a term is proportional to the number of documents where the term occurs. Red, orange, yellow and green colors are used for terms that occur in the current document; red indicates high interlinkedness of a term with other terms, orange, yellow and green decreasing interlinkedness. Blue is used for terms that have a relation with the terms in this document, but occur in other documents.
You can navigate and zoom the map. Mouse-hovering a term displays its timeline, clicking it yields the associated documents.

Author Collaborations