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Bemerkungen zu Ludwig Hohl als Philosophen


Ferber, Rafael (1992). Bemerkungen zu Ludwig Hohl als Philosophen. Schweizer Monatshefte, 72(5):405-411.

Abstract

The paper deals with Swiss philosopher Ludwig Hohl’s (1904-1980) aphoristic philosophy in his "Notes" (“Die Notizen oder von der unvoreiligen Versöhnung”). Hohl’s philosophy has three characteristic features: Heracliteanism (I), fragmentarism (II) and infinitism (III).
(I) For Hohl, life is never-ending change, movement, stream and productivity: it is shown in detail that this resembles Heraclitus’s concept of the world: Hohl’s aphoristic philosophy is a kind of Heracliteanism.
(II) Hohl fights all sorts of philosophical systems: “everything was a fragment, which ever has been produced” (Notes II.178). Like Fichte and Schlegel, Hohl thinks that the absolute can never be achieved completely, but only by infinite approximation. This fragmentarism is connected to his Heracliteanism: As everything changes all the time, we are not able to comprehend it as it really is.
(III) A result of his Heracliteanism is not only fragmentarism, but also infinitism: Reflexive thought never comes to an end.

Abstract

The paper deals with Swiss philosopher Ludwig Hohl’s (1904-1980) aphoristic philosophy in his "Notes" (“Die Notizen oder von der unvoreiligen Versöhnung”). Hohl’s philosophy has three characteristic features: Heracliteanism (I), fragmentarism (II) and infinitism (III).
(I) For Hohl, life is never-ending change, movement, stream and productivity: it is shown in detail that this resembles Heraclitus’s concept of the world: Hohl’s aphoristic philosophy is a kind of Heracliteanism.
(II) Hohl fights all sorts of philosophical systems: “everything was a fragment, which ever has been produced” (Notes II.178). Like Fichte and Schlegel, Hohl thinks that the absolute can never be achieved completely, but only by infinite approximation. This fragmentarism is connected to his Heracliteanism: As everything changes all the time, we are not able to comprehend it as it really is.
(III) A result of his Heracliteanism is not only fragmentarism, but also infinitism: Reflexive thought never comes to an end.

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Additional indexing

Item Type:Journal Article, not refereed, original work
Communities & Collections:06 Faculty of Arts > Institute of Philosophy
Dewey Decimal Classification:100 Philosophy
Language:German
Date:1992
Deposited On:13 Jan 2014 09:17
Last Modified:06 Aug 2017 04:46
Publisher:Schweizer Monatshefte
ISSN:0036-7400
Free access at:Publisher DOI. An embargo period may apply.
Related URLs:http://www.schweizermonat.ch/

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